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History of the Rain: A Novel epub

by Niall Williams


History of the Rain: A Novel epub

ISBN: 1620406470

ISBN13: 978-1620406472

Author: Niall Williams

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA; 1st American Edition edition (May 6, 2014)

Pages: 368 pages

ePUB book: 1714 kb

FB2 book: 1294 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 278

Other Formats: azw rtf lrf docx





Niall Williams clearly is one of these types, based on History of the Rain. Niall Williams writes with beautiful clarity and apparent ease. Hardly a chapter or page went by without a pause to take note of something profound.

Niall Williams clearly is one of these types, based on History of the Rain. So, of course, I love him the more for it. This is a story of family, history, love, tragedy, Ireland, and books. She's inherited her father's extensive library, where she attempts to find him, one book at a time.

History of the Rain book. A novel of beauty and grace, showing again that Niall Williams is more than a writer, he is a composer who elicits music from the magical combination of letters we know as words. We are our stories  . Young Ruth Swain has returned home from university to convalesce in her attic bedroom, where the rain of Co. Clare pours ceaselessly on the two windows above her head, and three thousand, nine hundred and fifty eight volumes of classic prose and poetry surround her in teetering stacks.

Niall Williams (born 1958, Dublin) is an Irish author. History of the Rain, his eighth novel was long listed for the 2014 Man Booker Prize. His most recent novel This is Happiness’ Has been nominated for best novel in the An Post Irish Book Awards Novels.

Niall Williams came to prominence in 1997 with the publication of his first book, Four Letters of Love. Williams's latest, the d History of the Rain, is no exception

Niall Williams came to prominence in 1997 with the publication of his first book, Four Letters of Love. Intense and poetic, it was an international bestseller and set the tone for his subsequent novels – fatalistic, lyrical works firmly embedded in the landscape of rural Ireland. Williams's latest, the d History of the Rain, is no exception.

Niall Williams was born in Dublin in 1958. Niall's first novel was Four Letters of Love At present he is at work on a novel, and a screenplay, and a book of short stories. He currently lives in west Clare with his wife and two children. He studied English and French literature at University College Dublin before graduating with a Master's degree in Modern American Literature. He moved to New York in 1980 where he married Christine Breen, whom he had met while she was a Master's student also at UCD, and took his first job opening. boxes of books in Fox and Sutherland's bookshop in Mount Kisco.

We tell them to stay alive or keep alive those who only live now in the telling. Williams, a gifted Irish writer, was known only for nonfiction until his first novel Four Letters of Love reaped a chorus of praise (including a PW Best Books accolade) a couple of years ago. Now he has tried to repeat the trick, but unfortunately the freshness that leaped from the pages has become mere practiced calculation.

History of the Rain: A Novel. History of the Rain - Niall Williams.

For Chris, in the rain. Everything is on its way to the river. ONE. The Salmon in Ireland. Chapter 1. The longer my father lived in this world the more he knew there was another to come. It was not that he thought this world beyond saving, although in darkness I suppose there was some of that, but rather that he imagined there must be a finer one where God corrected His mistakes and men and women lived in the second draft of Creation and did not know despair. My father bore a burden of impossible ambition.

Электронная книга "History of the Rain: A Novel", Niall Williams. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "History of the Rain: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

A celebration of books, love and the healing power of the imagination, this is an exquisite, funny, moving novel in which every sentence sings. A celebration of books, love and the healing power of the imagination, this is an exquisite, funny, moving novel in which every sentence sings. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Bedbound in her attic room beneath the falling rain, in the margin between this world and the next, Plain Ruth Swain is in search of her father, Virgil. To find him, enfolded in the mystery of ancestors, Ruthie must first trace the jutting jaw lines, narrow faces, and gleamy skin of the Swains from the restless Reverend Swain, her great-grandfather, to her grandfather Abraham, and finally to Virgil, through wild, rain-sodden history, exploits in pole-vaulting and salmon-fishing, poetry, and the 3,958 books piled high beneath the skylights in her room. Her funny, meandering narrative sings, moves, and irrevocably inspires.
I would give this book a hundred stars if I could. It is a classic about Ruth,a young Irish girl, struggling to find her way through despair and illness. The author takes the reader into the heart of her family. The characters have sharp powers of observation, flights of fancy, the love of talk, and great wit with a trace of sorrow, traits, it is maintained that the Irish have in abundance. I often forget the storyline and characters shortly after I have read a book. That will never happen with History of the Rain.
"There's a book inside you. There's a library inside me."

I woke up thinking about this novel, and I almost regret dedicating my morning to finishing it. But sometimes a story begs to be devoured.

Sometimes, you can tell an author is a devout reader through their writing. Niall Williams clearly is one of these types, based on History of the Rain. So, of course, I love him the more for it. This is a story of family, history, love, tragedy, Ireland, and books. And it's probably my favorite Man Booker 2014 longlisted novel so far.

Ruth lives in her room due to a vague illness and a fear of the outdoors. She's inherited her father's extensive library, where she attempts to find him, one book at a time. Throughout the story, books are dropped like rain, and I was personally reminded of how many I need to experience. Though I'm very familiar with one of the most important writers frequently mentioned: Yeats. For how could you not include him in an Irish novel about writing and poetry? So, he's there. History of the Rain will surely strike a chord in people who appreciate not just the story inside the books, but the history and physicality of them as well. I'm firmly in the camp of books being a necessary part of my home's ecosystem. But as I've gotten older I've come to relish certain stories not just for the meaning of their content but for the fact that they were purchased and read by my father. A few he's given to me, and reading them is something personally spectacular. Though I'm not searching for my father in the way Ruth must, I find through his books how he came to be who he is now, before I ever existed. A moment like this I could particularly see in my own father (and perhaps a quality in myself):
"The library that grew in our house contained all my father's idiosyncrasies, contained the man he was at thirty-five, and at forty, at forty-five. He did not edit himself. He did not look back at the books of ten years ago and pluck out the ones whose taste was no longer his."
I can relate to this as my Father's only daughter (and child), and the importance it's had on my own life. Williams writes of a father/daughter relationship not often seen in literature, though these are generally portrayed much less than father/son relationships in the first place.

Niall Williams writes with beautiful clarity and apparent ease. Hardly a chapter or page went by without a pause to take note of something profound. The imagery evoked in this sleepy community celebrates the Irish qualities that only such an account as this can excite. I wanted to fly to Ireland immediately while reading, but perhaps I should explore my own history first.

If themes like this are of any interest, I encourage a thorough reading of this chronicle of one family. Though you don't need to be a Swain, or Irish for that matter, you may find pieces of your own history in this account, like I did.

Highly recommended.
Irish girl Ruth Swain writes a homage to her recently departed father Virgil, an unpublished poet, whose life was burdened by never reaching the unattainable standard set by his father Abraham, who similarly could not meet that set by his father, and her great-grandfather, Absalom. The book moves back and forward in time relating the story of the Swain men who move from England to Ireland, amongst that of Ruth's life with her brother Aeney, mother Mary, father, and her Nan MacCarroll in a small village on the Irish west coast on the banks of the River Shannon. Ruth lies in bed ill, surrounded by the 3000 or so books her father has left her, whose characters are brought to life by comparison to her fellow villagers. Slow moving like the river, sometimes dreamlike, with Irish folk tales, spirits, and beliefs interleaved in the narrative, Niall builds the story towards its unstoppable and typically Irish tragic ending. It is an ode to books and reading, salmon fishing, rain, at times humourous (broadband? we haven't even got narrowband), with the backdrop of the collapse of the Irish economy a minor bit player. Nominated for the Booker Prize 2014. Highly recommended.
An Irish girl has some terrible disease (cancer?), and is stuck in her bed. She has read all of the thousands of books in her attic bedroom, many of them many times. Most are classics. Books are her entire life. So she writes a book about the history of her family, with an allusion to some literary character, author or event on almost every page.

The best things about this novel are (a) the fun of appreciating the allusions (okay, I didn't get at least 25% of them, not being as well informed on the classics...); (b) learning about life in a modern-day Irish small town; (c) watching the history of a very quirky family unfold; and (d) being amazed at the sheer beauty of the writing.

Also, it was great that the tongue-in-cheek descriptions of an Irish town never became cutesy or patronizing. You felt that the author really knew these townspeople, was irritated by them sometimes, amused by them sometimes, but also had a fundamental respect for them.

The writing is absolutely stunning. I kept wanting to underline whole paragraphs. Here's an example:

"I am thin but not of the sylph kind, more the gawky lanky kind which may be what constitutes the Swain Beautiful but feels Rangy Ruth to me. My knees are actually sharp. At that age I am officially Waiting for My Chest. The Chest Fairy is on the way from Boozoomia or somewhere and all the girls in my class are going to sleep at night in their own state of Great Expectation, waking up and checking: is that it? -- throwing their shoulders far back and breasting the world, as if the task of womanhood is to balance the weight that lands on your chest and could easily topple you over. Which in a way I suppose is true."

Here's another one:

"Each family functions in their own way, by rules reinvented daily. The strangeness of each of us is somehow accommodated so that there can be such a thing as family and we can all live for some time at least in the same house. Normal is what you know."

Now here's why I didn't give it five stars. It went on a bit too long. The descriptive parts were all very lovely, but there just so many of them. And I wanted to know what happened in the end. Even though I became impatient with a few of the characters sometimes, I also became quite fond of them, and wanted to see the plot resolve itself. I therefore ended up skimming over some of the beautiful descriptions, to reach what turned out to be a very satisfying ending.