Frantic epub

by Frances Lynn


Frantic epub

ISBN: 0955367220

ISBN13: 978-0955367229

Author: Frances Lynn

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: Eiworth Publishing (October 1, 2006)

Pages: 264 pages

ePUB book: 1234 kb

FB2 book: 1681 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 888

Other Formats: doc lrf lrf mobi





Frances Lynn is an English journalist and author. Lynn was born in St. Mary's Hospital, Paddington in London, and was educated at Malvern Girls' College.

Frances Lynn is an English journalist and author. Interview subjects included Frank Zappa.

Frantic by Frances Lynn" FRANTIC From heroin to Lithium and back again. There may be some survivors out there who could enjoy the powerful regression therapy this book has to offer. before finally arriving in a village called Sanity on the other side of Blissland.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Lynn Frances books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Showing 1 to 12 of 12 results. 38% off. C, You Can Do It! Lynn Frances.

Frances Lynn lives in the United Kingdom, enjoying life as a freelance journalist and a professional writer and author. Her two novels, "Frantic" and "Crushed" are published by Eiworth Publishing. Frances Lynn RSS Feed. Platinum Level Expert Author. Joined EzineArticles on Jul 13, 2006.

Frantic by Frances Lynn. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: Frances Lynn. No user reports were added yet. Be the first! Send report: This is a good book. Help us to make General-Ebooks better! Genres. Books ~~ Juvenile, Children's Fiction~~ Children's Fiction JUVENILE FICTION ~~ General.

Frantic is about the exploits of a young woman in the early 1970s in London and San Francisco, a hedonist world of which Frances had first hand experience. She apparently got the idea for Frantic from hanging out in David Hockney’s basement in the Seventies and her friendship with Celia Birtwell goes back to this period. Tags, 1970s, book, Celia Birtwell, Frantic by Frances Lynn, retro.

Seventies survivor Frances Lynn ruthlessly chronicles the psychotic highs and lows of Alice, a young English g. ISBN10 : 9780955367229, ISBN13 : 0955367220.

Самые новые твиты от frances brogan (tic1950): "I just signed the petition urging Prime Minister sJohnson to not scrap the Department for International Development. frances brogan начал(а) читать. co/JfymoDL4rG via @38 degrees". frances brogan‏ tic1950 17 дек. Еще. Скопировать ссылку на твит. She was absolutely crazy in those days. One evening we were having dinner and she suddenly said that she'd written a book, basically about herself and her life reporting parties.

Seventies survivor Frances Lynn ruthlessly chronicles the psychotic highs and lows of Alice, a young English girl who escapes London at the tail end of the Sixties for a sojourn in San Francisco. She quickly discovers that the psychedelic world of tie-dye and joss sticks belongs to the previous decade when she becomes involved with a glitter daubed, sprawling theatre group, leftovers from the insular Haight-Ashbury crowd. Alice gets sucked in beyond her head, but just when the crazy theatre group's popularity overdoses, she goes over the top and is shipped back to London. By now, the early Seventies are in full decay, as is Alice. She continues her downward slide by falling in obsession with a fragmented member of the Art World. Their exhausting fling, fuelled by a cocktail of opiates is interrupted by repetitive bouts of insanity, like a San Francisco acid flashback. No holds are barred in this frantic saga of drug-fractured psyches - and it's hard to guess who will stagger on into the eighties. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From the Back Cover Alice was born in a London Hospital during the Year of the Tiger and almost expired from a heavy chest cold but pulled through to face another lifetime thanks to the hospital?s Intensive Care unit. After that start, the road went steadily downwards. Author Frances Lynn, herself a survivor of the steaming Seventies, bars no holds and pulls no punches when telling the story of a wayward girl staggering into the drug-infested circles in San Francisco and London on her way to doom and destruction About the Author Frances Lynn was born in London and grew up in Notting Hill Gate. Her first job was at the BBC, but left after a year in order to travel to San Francisco. When she returned to London, she became Britain?s bitchiest columnist on the defunct Ritz magazine, simultaneously doing freelance work for Fleet Street papers and the London glossies. Frances Lynn now lives in central London, enjoying life as a professional writer and author.
Welcome to the world of sex, drugs, and disintegration. Frantic chronicles the crazy journey of Alice, an English girl, who somehow survives the insanity of the drug circles in San Francisco and London during the early seventies. There are many off-the-wall moments in Frantic, and Frances Lynn captures them with superb humor and amazing clarity.

Alice, like Alice in Wonderland, is on a trip. There are many colorful characters along the way. But there are many pitfalls as well, including trips to the mental hospital and attempted murder. I would say more but I don't want to give anything away.

Alice is a character that is very likeable, due to her resilience, passion, and knack for seeing through people. Lynn exposes the shallowness and general attitude problems of her characters, while at the same time rendering them in a vulnerable desperate state. There's something ominous in the air which becomes more and more apparent as you read on. Yet, I still found myself laughing through these moments.
Frances Lynn, who also wrote the book Crushed, is an extremely witty writer, whose character descriptions are unlike any that I have read before. They are often merciless, but they are not cold blooded assassinations. There's a ring of truth to them, which is what makes them so funny. Regardless, I would hate to be at the receiving end of Frances's pen.

Frantic is a great story that I highly recommend. Even for those who did not live through that period, this book will entertain you simply because it's such a spirited and hilarious ride.
In 'Frantic' we follow Alice, a naive English girl, aching to rebel against her posh upbringing, as she descends into a glittery hell peopled with dangerous grotesques and dusted with white powder.

After sharpening her claws on the butt end of the sixties, author Frances Lynn tears into the seventies' alternative scene with glee, exposing the hypocrisy, shallowness and sad junkie lifestyles of the 'beautiful people'. However, this is not just a novel about sex, drugs and rock n' roll; it's a novel filtered through them. So the reader gets to enjoy vivid acid tinged prose, and riotous cartoon depictions of San Francisco and London. At times, the style is reminiscent of counter-culture icons William S. Burroughs and Robert Anton Wilson, but with a fairy-tale sweetness neither of those authors have.

Fans of Frances Lynn's "Crushed", will recognise the same storytelling skills but may be shocked at the unbridled content. Freed from the constraints of writing for a teen audience, the author can display the the sharp wit which made her Britain's bitchiest columnist.

Like Alice says: "Wowee Zowee!"
There I was, down in the basement of Seed Restaurant in the psychedelic Sixties, dishing up the first organically grown natural foods to ever grace a British restaurant table. It was the cool place to eat, and the cream (and the whey) of the `underground' scene came through; one felt immense pride to be introducing them to wholesome living. That is, until Frances Lynn's book Frantic came into my hands.

Now I realize that once off-premises, many of my loyal customers proceeded to do everything possible to counter-balance their healthful experience at Seed, ingesting things that were definitely not macrobiotic and engaging in decidedly unwholesome behaviour. How could they! The brown rice obviously wasn't `speaking' to them.

Sure they had fun, and Frances spares no details in her rich and fulsome recounting of the wilder side of London and San Francisco in the late 60's/early 70's, so much so that I feel like I was there - and I was, but now know what part of "there" I was missing out upon. But at what price, the fun? After reading her book, I am not sure whether to feel left out of the action, or smug that I spent that time chewing each mouthful a hundred times. I can feel both.

Thank the muses; Frances unbelievably survived to tell the tale, managing to do so without glorifying her colourful characters. I'd rather laugh at their faults and foibles than feel sad for them, recognizing that had they got with the wholesome programme then Frances may never have written her very entertaining book. Would the world be a poorer place thereby?
There I was, down in the basement of Seed Restaurant in the psychedelic Sixties, dishing up the first organically grown natural foods to ever grace a British restaurant table. It was the cool place to eat, and the cream (and the whey) of the `underground' scene came through; one felt immense pride to be introducing them to wholesome living. That is, until Frances Lynn's book Frantic came into my hands.

Now I realize that once off-premises, many of my loyal customers proceeded to do everything possible to counter-balance their healthful experience at Seed, ingesting things that were definitely not macrobiotic and engaging in decidedly unwholesome behaviour. How could they! The brown rice obviously wasn't `speaking' to them.

Sure they had fun, and Frances spares no details in her rich and fulsome recounting of the wilder side of London and San Francisco in the late 60's/early 70's, so much so that I feel like I was there - and I was, but now know what part of "there" I was missing out upon. But at what price, the fun? After reading her book, I am not sure whether to feel left out of the action, or smug that I spent that time chewing each mouthful a hundred times. I can feel both.

Thank the muses; Frances unbelievably survived to tell the tale, managing to do so without glorifying her colourful characters. I'd rather laugh at their faults and foibles than feel sad for them, recognizing that had they got with the wholesome programme then Frances may never have written her very entertaining book. Would the world be a poorer place thereby?