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The Lay of the Land epub

by Richard Ford


The Lay of the Land epub

ISBN: 0747581886

ISBN13: 978-0747581888

Author: Richard Ford

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: Bloomsbury; Second printing edition (2006)

Pages: 496 pages

ePUB book: 1137 kb

FB2 book: 1317 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 176

Other Formats: lrf mobi azw docx





Home Richard Ford The Lay of the Land. A rain squall that would never reach land hung against the lightening eastern sky. I took a sampling glance back at my house-all mirrored windows, little belvederes, copper copings, a weather vane on the top-most gable.

Home Richard Ford The Lay of the Land. The lay of the land, . I didn’t want Clarissa to get up from her bed, have a stretch and a scratch, cast a welcoming eye toward the sea and suddenly believe that her dad was taking the deep-six plunge alone.

Death and its low-lying ambuscade don’t scare me much.

For future historians of present-day America, the Richard Ford's The Lay of the Land will be essential reading, says Tim .

For future historians of present-day America, the Richard Ford's The Lay of the Land will be essential reading, says Tim Adams. It returns Richard Ford after a decade to the voice of Frank Bascombe, a voice already among the indelible creations of contemporary fiction: rooted in New Jersey suburbia, elegiac for American dreams, shot through with quiet comedy and capable of sudden, wrenching pathos. It is Thanksgiving in the millennium year.

Praise for Richard Ford: Ford captures the intricacies of human beings better than just about any other writer alive. Lay of the Land is the third book in a trilogy about novelist turned sportswriter turned realtor Frank Bascomb. is a great surveyor of human nature, a master of the small moments that take place in between and shape the larger movements of our lives. The first novel, The Sportswriter was an excellent read, and the second, Independence Day, won a Pulitzer Prize. This third novel, published in 2006 (which goes to show I've fallen behind in my reading - hence the New Year's resolution), is as good as the previous two.

Richard Ford (born February 16, 1944) is an American novelist and short story writer. His best-known works are the novel The Sportswriter and its sequels, Independence Day, The Lay of the Land and Let Me Be Frank With You, and the short story collection Rock Springs, which contains several widely anthologized stories. His novel Wildlife was adapted into a 2018 film of the same name.

With The Sportswriter, in 1986, Richard Ford commenced a cycle of novels that ten years later-after Independence Day .

With The Sportswriter, in 1986, Richard Ford commenced a cycle of novels that ten years later-after Independence Day won both the Frank Bascombe returns, with a new lease on life (and real estate), more acutely in thrall to life’s endless complexities than ever before.

I’m expecting a storefront to be open at 3:30 on Thanksgiving eve, with GLASS on the menu. These places thrive on every street corner in America, though they vanish when you want one. Wintry effluvium has turned my vehicle into an icebox, and I’ve cranked the heat up on my feet, my belly already sensing a mixed signal from my hot dog. The three boats parable is, in fact, a useful moral directive, and though Wade would sneer at me, in my own view I’ve heeded it by giving a wide berth to the Grove and Vicki/Ricki, or whatever her name is.

My great book of the year was Richard Ford’s The Lay of the Land, his Ulysses, a long, painstakingly attentive . Ford crafts a mesmerizing narrative voice-one that gives us, with offhanded eloquence and a kind of grim mirth, "the lay of the land.

My great book of the year was Richard Ford’s The Lay of the Land, his Ulysses, a long, painstakingly attentive, humanely comical celebration of the mid-life of his New Jersey real-estate salesman, Frank Bascombe, an American citizen at odds with, and at home in, America, whose story, so wonderfully written in every breath of every sentence, will teach you how. to lead a well-examined life 'on the human scale'-and how to leave it. Financial Times - Jeremy Treglown.

Электронная книга "The Lay of the Land: Bascombe Trilogy (3)", Richard Ford. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Lay of the Land: Bascombe Trilogy (3)" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

NATIONAL BESTSELLERNational Book Critics Circle Award FinalistA New York Times Best Book of the YearA .

NATIONAL BESTSELLERNational Book Critics Circle Award FinalistA New York Times Best Book of the YearA sportswriter and a real estate agent, husband and father –Frank Bascombe has been many things to many people. His uncertain youth behind him, we follow him through three days during the autumn of 2000, when his trade as a realtor on the Jersey Shore is thriving. The author of five novels and two collections of stories, Richard Ford was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award for Independence Day, the first book to win both prizes. In 2001, he received the PEN/Malamud Award for excellence in short fiction.

Physical description; 485 p. Summary; It is fall, 2000 and Frank Bascombe has arrived at a state of optimistic pragmatism that he calls the Permanent Period of life. Epic mistakes have already been made, dreams downsized, and Frank reflects that now at least there are fewer opportunities left in life to get things wrong. But the tranquillity he anticipated is not to be. In fact, as Thanksgiving dinner with his children and first wife nears, the Permanent Period proves as full of possibility as life had ever been. In his third Frank Bascombe novel, Richard Ford contemplates the human character with wry precision. Graceful, expansive, filled with pathos but irresistibly funny, "The Lay of the Land" is a modern American masterpiece. Subjects; Bascombe, Frank (Fictitious character) - Fiction. Middle-aged men - Fiction. Cancer - Patients - Fiction. American fiction - 20th century. New Jersey - Fiction. Modern fiction. FICTION / General. Genre; Novel.
I found it hard to Stay with Frank on this one. He's got prostate cancer and a couple of screwed up kids, the son is at least, and a complicated marital history. Number 1 is gone for good and number 2 is off in the Scottish highlands with her ex, and he longs for her. He's a realtor in the New Jersey shore area. Mostly, he thinks about his health and death. This is 450 pages of musing. At times, it gets interesting, and Ford's always good at getting the political-cultural backdrop of the times into the story. But it's also very sloooow at many points. I think The Sportswriter is far better. I read Independence Day a couple of years ago but i honestly can barely remember it. I suppose if one's never had prostate cancer and thus looked death in the eye, he has no right to say much. But this seems like an awful lot of navel gazing to me-too much.
I’ve read most of Ford’s work going back to his short stories and I love the on-going syncopated stream of consciousness banter of his characters, certainly in this book with Frank Bascombe. I empathize with the turmoil of Frank’s middle years that so many of us suffer – our adult children, our concern for health, our frustrations with work and family and the questioning that results from an active and un-satisfied mind, a mind which is unwilling to settle, perhaps, with the "lay of the land."

Frank Bascombe is not a smug, self-satisfied man. He is still searching for answers, and continues to grow and learn in spite of the conventions of his middle class Waspish New Jersey community. I sincerely hope to meet him again in “Let me be Frank with You.”

Sue McGhee, Author "When the Eagle Flies with the Condor."
This is, to my way of thinking, the best of the 3 Frank Bascombe novels. Frank is now all "growed up" and facing the inevitabilities of late middle age (he's 55): prostrate cancer, ungrateful or at least emotionally angular children, possible failure of a second marriage and re-connection of a first, perhaps early retirement. Frank remains one of the great creations of modern fiction, precisely for what he is not -- heroic, existentially confused, depressed, or captured by a mid-life hormone surge. He's a real human, better than most, but not without flaws; the kind of person I'd like for a friend. He's nothing to excess: intelligent but casually so, kind but capable of the occasional cruelty, wealthy but not showy, and despite all of the above not the least bit boring. After all, you gotta love a guy who can feel entirely comfortable and happy getting drunk in a lesbian bar and be able to express guiltless anger at a sorry-for-himself, vaguely dysfunctional son who blames his father for his unhappiness. I stress the character because the plot isn't much -- to be sure things happen, ordinary things really (Frank's days are filled with more bits and pieces of pastel drama than mine, but still not earth-shaking). His philosophical musings on his life's conditions are interesting, sophisticated, and often wryly funny, and it is his interior life that is the subject of the novel. Wordy? Yes and perhaps 50 pages too long. I tend to be a fast reader and sometimes (to my regret) skip over material that doesn't move a plot along. This book requires considerable attention for maximum benefit, and I found myself rereading some passages, in part to be sure I hadn't missed anything important and in part because the writing really is quite lovely, even poetic (if a low-key way). For those of us who enjoyed the first two novels, this is a must-read. It is certainly possible to read this without having done the first two, but some of the richness of Frank's life would be lost. One of the best books I have read in the past 5 years or so, and I'm hoping we'll be a 4th Bascombe novel. Highly recommended but not for those who are impatient or favor plot over character.
When you foolishly make a New Year's resolution to read fifty-two books in fifty-two weeks, a pledge I foolishly made, Lay of the Land is so not the way to begin the marathon. This is not a book to race through, nor is it a book that will grab you by the lapels and pull you headlong from start to finish. No. It's a book to be savored and enjoyed for what it is -- a character study and compelling portrait of America through one man's eyes.

Lay of the Land is the third book in a trilogy about novelist turned sportswriter turned realtor Frank Bascomb. The first novel, The Sportswriter was an excellent read, and the second, Independence Day, won a Pulitzer Prize. This third novel, published in 2006 (which goes to show I've fallen behind in my reading -- hence the New Year's resolution), is as good as the previous two. You can read it alone and learn the back story as you go along. Still, Richard Ford writes so well, you really should start with The Sportswriter and move on from there.

This novel covers a couple or three days in Frank Bascomb's life, right around Thanksgiving Day, 2000. Don't look for plot. Don't stop and ask where the story is going. It will take you where it wants to go -- sometimes to the ordinary but more often to one surprise after another. You'll learn all about Frank, his past and his relationships, almost all of which are at least borderline dysfunctional and sadly in need of repair. You'll feel for Frank as a man whose life isn't what he wanted it to be, even though he is now a wealthy and successful businessman. You'll root for him throughout a tale full of humor, brilliant characterization and plenty of emotion.

I hope you enjoy this novel as much as I did.

Joe