The Drowner epub

by Robert Drewe


The Drowner epub

ISBN: 1862070644

ISBN13: 978-1862070646

Author: Robert Drewe

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: Penguin; 1st Edition. edition (1997)

Pages: 344 pages

ePUB book: 1146 kb

FB2 book: 1158 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 365

Other Formats: mbr azw mobi lrf





Robert Drewe's The Drowner is one of the best books I have read this year. I stumbled across it by chance. Looking for scholarly material on The S The best books leave you gasping for air, drowning in jealousy that you did not write them

Robert Drewe's The Drowner is one of the best books I have read this year. Looking for scholarly material on The S The best books leave you gasping for air, drowning in jealousy that you did not write them. They fill you with the need to reread them, to prove to yourself the assumptions you have made. They make sense only in a place of consciousness which exists in the space between reader and writer, and linger like perfume in the air a while after you've finished. Robert Drewe's The Drowner is one of the best books I have read this year.

The Drowner by Robert Drewe. A great book imprints itself, so one recalls it without effort, and this book isn't there. It's probably not worth a whole lot of effort to track down; but, if you run across a copy, it's worth picking up. Then, tell me I'm wrong.

Robert Duncan Drewe (born 9 January 1943) is an Australian novelist, non-fiction and short story writer. Robert Drewe was born on 9 January 1943 in Melbourne, Victoria. At the age of six, he moved with his family to Perth. He grew up on the West Australian coast and was educated at Hale School. He joined The West Australian as a cadet reporter.

PENGUIN BOOKS the drowner Robert Drewe was born in Melbourne and grew up on the West Australian coast. They draw water from the river and transform it into a shallow, continuously moving film. This sheet of water has to nourish and protect the tender grass shoots without swamping them. Even when his ‘little drownings’ are complete, he stays vigilant.

The Drowner (1996) is a novel by Australian author Robert Drewe. It was shortlisted for Miles Franklin Award, and won the Vance Palmer Prize for Fiction and New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards - Book of the Year in 1997

The Drowner (1996) is a novel by Australian author Robert Drewe. It was shortlisted for Miles Franklin Award, and won the Vance Palmer Prize for Fiction and New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards - Book of the Year in 1997. In the late 19th century an Englishman irrigator or "drowner", Will Dance, utilises ancient water-knowledge and modern technology to save a drought-ridden town in Western Australia.

The Drowner (Paperback). Robert Drewe (author). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

These stories breathe.

In the warm alkaline waters of the public bath a headstrong young engineer accidentally collides with a beautiful actress. These stories breathe. Taut yet teeming with life, they are shot through with gritty phrases that catch at one's throat. Internationally acclaimed novelist Robert Drewe returns to the short-story territory he has made his own. Set against the backdrop of the Australian coast, as randomly and imminently violent as it is beautiful, The Rip reveals the fragility of relationships between husbands and wives, children and parents, friends and lovers.

Robert Drewe is the author of seven novels, four books of short stories, two memoirs, six other works of non-fiction and two plays. His work has been widely translated, and adapted for film, television, theatre and radio.

by. Drewe, Robert, 1943-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. New York : St. Martin's Press. t on September 20, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

You have to be into romantic novels to appreciate this work. Although the Coolgardie goldfields pipeline is the backdrop, the pipeline doesn't have prominence. O'Connor is not accurately portrayed and much of the pipeline account is fictionalised. Really, a tale of outback romance, circa 1900.
It has been some time since I read this book. I recollect is as quirky, well-written though not particularly memorable.
Imaginative and empathic writing. More than just 'historical fiction' - you are really transported to the places and times, and taken inside the characters.
I read "The Drowner" a couple of months ago, enjoyed it immensely, recommended it to my wife, and planned to write a glowing review. But, now, I have to think hard to remember it. As I think about it, details come back, and I smile remembering (what's a "drowner?", the idea of the aquaduct, that French guy!). A great book imprints itself, so one recalls it without effort, and this book isn't there. But it's a fine novel nonetheless, certainly much better than most of the bestselling tripe available -- it's just not quite as good as I'd hoped it would be.
"The Drowner" appears to be unavailable to the US audience today, and that's a shame. It's probably not worth a whole lot of effort to track down; but, if you run across a copy, it's worth picking up. Then, tell me I'm wrong.
More of a stylised "romance" than a plot-driven novel. Drewe's evocative prose sustains an amazing unity of effect through water and desert imagery, using these as metaphors for the emotional, physical, and intellectual ways in which humans communicate (or fail to do so) under the stress of life's changes. The book's historical sensibility is similar to that of Ondaatje's _The English Patient_, as is the richly sensual language and psychology of the narrative as a whole.