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The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (Harper Perennial Modern Classics) epub

by Brian Moore


The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (Harper Perennial Modern Classics) epub

ISBN: 0007255616

ISBN13: 978-0007255610

Author: Brian Moore

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: Harper Perennial; Re-issue edition (July 1, 2007)

Pages: 256 pages

ePUB book: 1936 kb

FB2 book: 1275 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 539

Other Formats: rtf txt lrf mbr





A timeless classic dealing with the complexity and hardships of relationships, addiction and faith. Judith Hearne, a Catholic middle-aged spinster, moves into yet another bed-sit in Belfast. A socially isolated woman of modest means, she teaches piano to a handful of students to pass the day.

A timeless classic dealing with the complexity and hardships of relationships, addiction and faith. Her only social activity is tea with the O'Neill family, who secretly dread her weekly visits. Judith soon meets wealthy James Madden and fantasises about marrying this lively, debonair man. But Madden sees her in an entirely different light, as a potential investor in a business proposal.

An almost classic example of the power given by unity of them. oore reveals all the qualities of a born novelist. Praise for Brian Moore: ‘From his first to his last novel, Moore has an uncanny ability to imagine his way into the emotions and sexuality of his character. here aren’t many writers who do this comparably well – Flaubert, Chekhov, Julian Barnes, William Trevor come to mind.

A timeless classic dealing with the complexity and hardships of relationships addiction and faith.

Books : The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (Harper Perennial Modern Classics) (Paperback). A timeless classic dealing with the complexity and hardships of relationships addiction and faith. Harper Perennial Modern Classics. Books related to The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (Harper Perennial Modern Classics).

Judith Hearne is an unmarried woman of a certain age who has come down in society. Mitigation is I tried to think of a more depressing novel than Brian Moore's The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne, and I came up with exactly nada. She has few skills and is full of the prejudices and pieties of her genteel Belfast upbringing. Even Holocaust literature usually aspires to some mitigating, redemptive element to remind the reader that-even though the world is a sick, twisted, hateful, miserable, incomprehensibly fucked-up place-there are still nooks and crannies of goodness to be found here and there. Or what passes for goodness on the sliding scale of values, at any rate.

The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne is a 1987 drama film made by HandMade Films Ltd. and United British Artists (UBA) starring Maggie Smith and Bob Hoskins. It was directed by Jack Clayton (his final theatrical film) and produced by Richard Johnsonand Peter Nelson, with George Harrison and Denis O'Brien as executive producers. The music score was by Georges Delerue and the cinematography by Peter Hannan.

Of course, it helps that the book is an NYRB Classic. When you trust an imprint as much as I trust them, you can afford to select their books based on their covers. But really, the cover was the kicker. The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne takes place in Belfast in the middle of the century

Judith Hearne (later republished as The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne), was regarded by Northern Irish-Canadian writer Brian Moore as his first novel.

Judith Hearne (later republished as The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne), was regarded by Northern Irish-Canadian writer Brian Moore as his first novel. The book was published in 1955, after Moore had left Ireland and was living in Canada. It was rejected by ten American publishers before being accepted by a British publisher. Diana Athill's memoir, Stet (2000), has information about the publishing of Judith Hearne.

Title: The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1987)

Title: The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1987). Maggie Smith is enormously affecting as Irish piano teacher Judith Hearne, whose life is plagued by Catholic guilt; painful memories of her early life with a difficult, wealthy aunt; and the less-than-genteel situation in which she now finds herself. At the shabby boarding house where she lives, Hearne meets the brother of her landlady. As they become friendlier, she seizes on the chance that this man will save her from a dismal life as a poor spinster. The uniformly fine cast includes Bob Hoskins and Prunella Scales.

A timeless classic dealing with the complexity and hardships of relationships, addiction and faith. Judith Hearne, a Catholic middle-aged spinster, moves into yet another bed-sit in Belfast. A socially isolated woman of modest means, she teaches piano to a handful of students to pass the day. Her only social activity is tea with the O'Neill family, who secretly dread her weekly visits. Judith soon meets wealthy James Madden and fantasises about marrying this lively, debonair man. But Madden sees her in an entirely different light, as a potential investor in a business proposal. On realising that her feelings are not reciprocated, she turns to an old addiction -- alcohol. Having confessed her problems to an indifferent priest, she soon loses her faith and binges further. She wonders what place there is for her in a world that so values family ties and faith, both of which she is without.
I know people sometimes slip into hyperbole when they write reviews but on my honour I can truthfully say I have never read a more emotionally crushing novel than this masterpiece by Brian Moore. I legit cried during a couple parts and there were times I wanted to put the book aside and go read something lighter and easier but I couldn't.
The story takes place in Belfast in the 1950's and the main character is a lonely, poverty stricken, repressed spinster named Judith Hearne. She lives in furnished rooms on a meagre income with her meagre belongings and has very little to live for. The few social connections she has are mostly people taking pity on her out of a sense of Christian charity. She has no real prospects of finding decent employment or a husband.
The descriptions of bedsits, poverty and truly deep loneliness are heartbreaking and remind me of The Smiths at their saddest and best. I wonder if Morrissey was a fan of this novel?
Midway through the story a small ray of hope enters Judith's pitiful life in the form of a man returned to Ireland from America. But there is no happy ending, no hope and no one to rescue Judith from her misery. At the end the reader knows that Judith will die as she has lived, poverty stricken and alone. The author's skill makes us realize that this story is probably happening all the time. There are probably tens of thousands of people in our society right now living like this and there probably won't be happy endings for them either.
This book is brilliant. It takes you to the depths of despair and shows you around if you are brave enough to take the journey. The best literary examination of loneliness I have ever come across. I'm baffled as to why this book isn't more widely known but perhaps it is a little too much for the general public who've been raised on happy endings.
This exquisitely written novel writes unflinchingly of a genteel, middle-aged Irish Catholic lady living in Belfast in the 1950’s. She is plain, she has few useful skills (at least in the world of business), and she is a spinster. Her two chief possessions, adorning the walls of the shabby boarding house in which she resides, are a picture of her deceased stern aunt, whose grip on her is as yet unloosened, and a print of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, a sign of a piety whose grasp is equally unshakable. And therein lies the passion of “The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne.”

For Miss Hearne has a passionate nature, deep within her. She longs for the love of a man. And if she cannot have that, she longs for the spiritual consolation that will carry her through her days. Both longings prove to be impossible to fulfill, even though at time, at least to Miss Hearne, their fulfillment seems to be within sight, and even though they are irreconcilable longings. And so, quite shockingly and, it would seem, not at all inevitably, she turns to drink.

Despite the novel’s pathos, there are wonderful comic portraits: of the scoundrel James Madden, returned from Brooklyn; of the landlady Mrs. Rice and her fat son Bernard; of the unkind priest, Francis Xavier Quigley.

To enter the world of Judith Hearne, so beautiful and so bleakly sketched, is to enter another time and place and to be invited to think about the suffering of a woman so ordinary and unassuming that she is, to all intents and purposes, invisible.

M. Feldman
The Northern Irishman Brian Moore wrote JUDITH HEARNE when he was only twenty-seven. The first of his novels to be published under his own name (his other published works had been genre fictions published under a pseudonym), it had been rejected by multiple publishers until it was finally accepted, and it immediately made his name as a major writing talent. For years different directors and publishers wanted to bring the story to the screen and to the stage; it was finally made into a film in the late 1980s directed by Jack Clayton and starring Maggie Smith.

THE LONELY PASSION OF JUDITH HEARNE (as Moore later re-titled it) is a character study of a plain and down-at-heels spinster living in her forties in Belfast near the middle of the twentieth century. We first meet Judy Hearne through her thoughts and those of the people who inhabit her boarding house: Moore was much influenced in this stage of his career by James Joyce, and we discretely move through the characters' thoughts as the narrative progresses. As it does so, we find out more about Judith that contradicts not only what she had told others but even herself in her private moments. Raised by a strict and financially comfortable aunt, whom she loved but who demanded Judith sacrifice everything to take care of her, she has ended up imprisoned in virtually in genteel poverty by history, by her family, by her Church, and her own pride; she is loved by no one, and has no hope of better prospects. We learn too in time that she is only now in a dry spell from the alcoholism she has developed in later life. And a misunderstanding with her landlady's brutal but charming brother results in Judith's return to the bottle.

The novel is cruelly constructed, perhaps in the way that only a younger writer of great talent would, so as to take almost everything away from Judith by the conspiracy of circumstance. Everything becomes taken away from her, including her only mainstays, her snobbish genteel pride and her simple faith. The narrative is shaped nearly like the stations of the Cross, with Judith undergoing in the work's second half a series of trials which threaten to take more and more away from her. I was afraid to read the novel, having heard of its reputation, and even so it was an even more viscerally devastating read than I had imagined: Brian Moore spares Judith (and his readers) almost nothing, showing what life is like with no companionship, no mercy, no prospects, and no faith. It would be hard to imagine recommending anyone to read this knowing how rough the read can be; yet even so I know I'll come back to it, because it is so beautifully crafted.
Such a sad story of a tortured soul. A beautifully executed novel that does pack a wallop. I've had this novel in my to be read pile for years and have had a lot of recommendations for it but the timing just wasn't right for the read.

It's an emotionally draining read, of a complex woman, her "battle" with alcohol, her guilt, and her faith. I can't remember having read a novel where a male author has been able to portray a woman so finely, delicately as the author was able to do in this novel.