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The Whaling Expedition of the Ulysses, 1937-38 (New Perspectives on Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology) epub

by Quentin R. Walsh


The Whaling Expedition of the Ulysses, 1937-38 (New Perspectives on Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology) epub

ISBN: 0813034795

ISBN13: 978-0813034799

Author: Quentin R. Walsh

Category: History

Subcategory: World

Language: English

Publisher: University Press of Florida; First Edition edition (October 24, 2010)

Pages: 400 pages

ePUB book: 1467 kb

FB2 book: 1728 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 399

Other Formats: mobi lit txt mbr





I bought this book for my father who was on this ship as a lad of 15 when he first left Norway

Series: New Perspectives on Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology. I bought this book for my father who was on this ship as a lad of 15 when he first left Norway. I have not read the book yet myself, but my 91 yr. old father remembers all about life on board ship that year which the author talks about but my father tells me he does not always agree with the author's point of view.

In the spring of 1937, Coast Guard Lieutenant Quentin Robert Walsh received a. .

In the spring of 1937, Coast Guard Lieutenant Quentin Robert Walsh received a special assignment aboard the whaling factory ship Ulysses. A more general history and a description of similar elements from the original report are here combined into a history of American whaling. The book includes a discussion of seven species of whalebone whales. The Ulysses processed her whales and manufactured the whale oil within the territorial limits of Australia and within the port limits of Carnarvon, Western Australia.

One book is a sea tale about whaling that is both exciting and horrible

In the spring of 1937, Coast Guard Lieutenant Quentin Robert Walsh received a special assignment aboard the whaling factory ship Ulysses. One book is a sea tale about whaling that is both exciting and horrible. It is well worth reading whether you are interested in the history of whaling, or fascinated by stories of men and ships. The other book is full of statistics that, honestly, I wasn't into.

In the spring of 1937, Coast Guard Lieutenant Quentin Robert Walsh received a special assignment aboard the whaling .

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1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

An indispensable resource for anyone interested in teaching American maritime history. -Christopher P. Magra, California State University at Northridge.

Maritime archaeology deals with shipwrecks and is carried out by divers .

Maritime archaeology deals with shipwrecks and is carried out by divers rather than diggers. It embraces maritime history and analyses changes in shipbuilding, navigation and seamanship and offers fresh perspectives on the cultures and societies that produced the ships and sailors.

They were out to make money; he was there to uncover the truth

 

"A unique first-hand account of a singular experience in Coast Guard history by an extraordinary officer."--W. Russell Webster, U.S. Coast Guard (Ret)

 

"The most detailed description of whales and the killing of them that has been penned in the English language."--Dennis Noble, author of Rescue of the Gale Runner

 

In the spring of 1937, Coast Guard Lieutenant Quentin Robert Walsh received a special assignment aboard the whaling factory ship Ulysses. His orders were to monitor the commercial operation's compliance with international agreements protecting marine life, and what he observed shocked him.

The Ulysses flew the American flag, but Walsh quickly realized that the venture was a foreign affair intent on harvesting whales of illegal size and importing the resulting whale oil duty-free into the U.S. market. This behemoth floating "factory" killed with appalling efficiency in order to reap tremendous profits. Over 3,600 whales were butchered during the ship's ten-month cruise.

Though he was later an eyewitness to the death and devastation of D-day, Walsh maintained to the end of his life that his experience aboard the Ulysses had been the most horrifying he had ever endured.

His report on the voyage--made widely available to the public here for the first time--helped set the stage for current U.S. policy in opposition to open sea whaling. Composed in an elegant yet direct style, his account is both a straightforward description of commercial whaling in the twentieth century and a compelling argument against it.

 

 

I bought this book for my father who was on this ship as a lad of 15 when he first left Norway. I have not read the book yet myself, but my 91 yr. old father remembers all about life on board ship that year which the author talks about but my father tells me he does not always agree with the author's point of view. My father was on three more expeditions aboard this same ship before he had to leave the ship and he became a US citizen who fought as an infantry man in WWII.