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Dreaming, Religion and Society in Africa (Studies of Religion in Africa) epub

by Jedrej,Shaw


Dreaming, Religion and Society in Africa (Studies of Religion in Africa) epub

ISBN: 9004089365

ISBN13: 978-9004089365

Author: Jedrej,Shaw

Category: History

Subcategory: World

Language: English

Publisher: Brill (August 1, 1997)

Pages: 196 pages

ePUB book: 1494 kb

FB2 book: 1635 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 240

Other Formats: doc lrf docx mbr





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Studies of Religion in Africa, Volume: .

Other religions found in Africa have their origins in other parts of the world . In traditional African societies, many people seek out diviners on a regular basis. There are generally no prohibitions against the practice. Followers of traditional African religions pray to various spirits as well as to their ancestors. This includes also nature, elementary and animal spirits. The difference between powerful spirits and gods is often minimal. Most African societies believe in several high gods and a large amount of lower gods and spirits.

Religion in Africa is multifaceted and has been a major influence on art, culture and philosophy. Today, the continent's various populations and individuals are mostly adherents of Christianity, Islam, and to a lesser extent several traditional African religions. In Christian or Islamic communities, religious beliefs are also sometimes characterized with syncretism with the beliefs and practices of traditional religions.

Religions have been a vital and often under-studied factor in these transformations and are equally .

Religions have been a vital and often under-studied factor in these transformations and are equally interwoven with present-day African politics and societies, perhaps more than anywhere else in the world. The course examines the relationship between religious and political/social developments in Africa by way of concrete regional examples from the 19th century to present issues, thereby carving out historical continuities and contingencies as well as regional commonalities and differences. Special attention is given to African Christianity and Islam.

African Traditional Religion is the traditional religion of the African people before the coming of Islam and .

African Traditional Religion is the traditional religion of the African people before the coming of Islam and Christianity. However, the missionaries of the two foreign religions succeeded in converting some African people to the new religions. It is interesting to note that African traditional religion is being studied in many Universities and Colleges in Africa since the beginning of the 20th century, so that it may not go into total neglect in African history and culture. The study, therefore, is facing many challenges which are affecting the interest of African scholars in the field.

This important new reference covers African and African-American religion in sub-Saharan Africa, North America. This second volume in the Routledge Religion and Society series (The Encyclopedia of Millennialism and Millennial Movements was published last year ) treats religious movements, churches, and the place of religion in African and African American societies. Special attention is given African-derived religion in many other countries- Brazil, Cuba, Jamaica, and other points in the Black Diaspora, comprising some 20 percent of the articles.

African Traditional Religion, like any other religion, has its own features, many of which are .

African Traditional Religion, like any other religion, has its own features, many of which are:, Belief in smaller deities and ancestors to whom libations are made and sacrifices offered,, Belief in the fact that the human being is weak and has to depend on benevolent transcendent powers for protection and sustenance and . There are discussions about their similarities and differences, co-habitation and their influences on the host communities. This study also covers their mode of practice, temples and shrines, including their mode of worship.

The systematic, comparative study of African religion and culture largely began in the colonial era, when Western anthropologists were . Patterns of Thought in Africa and the West: Essays on Magic, Religion, and Science. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1993.

The systematic, comparative study of African religion and culture largely began in the colonial era, when Western anthropologists were preceded by Christian missionaries. Historians took up studies even later, but the important introduction and case studies in Ranger and Kimambo 1972 show what historians should and can do. Vansina 1985 is a guidebook to recovering history from oral traditions, while Herbert 1993 uses physical objects as a basis for exploring ideas and beliefs. DOI: 1. E-mail Citation .

conference, "The Place of African Traditional Religion in Contemporary Africa," took place in Nairobi, Kenya, on September 10-14, 1987.

Yet, this tradition continues to suffer from lack of acceptance and inadequate understanding of its central tenets and essence. The two monotheistic traditions, Islam and Christianity, to which most Africans have converted over the century, have developed a hostile attitude to this tradition; Islam relegates it to al-Jahilliyya, the time of barbarism, and Christianity views it as pure paganism. conference, "The Place of African Traditional Religion in Contemporary Africa," took place in Nairobi, Kenya, on September 10-14, 1987.

The contributors to this investigation of dreaming in a diversity of African cultures and settings have each approached the matter with a respect for an indigenous discourse which does not necessarily subscribe to Western evaluations of the objective and subjective. The matter of dreaming is not so much a psychological constant as ultimately sociological and historical.Dream discourse as a strategy deploys contingencies in the elaboration of social relationships and the defence, restoration and promotion of identities. Dreaming is therefore prominent in such critical settings as sickness and healing, artistic inspiration and craftwork, election to religious office, conversion to Islam or Christianity.