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The Man Who Killed Rasputin: Prince Youssoupov and the Murder That Helped Bring Down the Russian Empire epub

by Greg King


The Man Who Killed Rasputin: Prince Youssoupov and the Murder That Helped Bring Down the Russian Empire epub

ISBN: 1559722959

ISBN13: 978-1559722957

Author: Greg King

Category: History

Subcategory: Russia

Language: English

Publisher: Birch Lane Pr; First Edition, First Printing edition (February 1, 1996)

Pages: 306 pages

ePUB book: 1704 kb

FB2 book: 1982 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 163

Other Formats: lrf docx doc lrf





King (The Last Empress, LJ 6/15/94) has written a nonacademic work whose strength lies not in shocking . Yusupov knew Rasputin's motives and knew Rasputin was intrumental in bringing down the Tzar and the murder of his family by the Bolshevichs.

King (The Last Empress, LJ 6/15/94) has written a nonacademic work whose strength lies not in shocking revelations of how Felix Youssoupov killed Rasputin. The author of this book doesn't bother to provide evidence for his claims. He literally makes things up as he goes along.

I like reading Greg King's books as he has a wonderfully engaging writing style, but at times he tends to play fast .

I like reading Greg King's books as he has a wonderfully engaging writing style, but at times he tends to play fast and loose with the facts. In "The Man Who Killed Rasputin", he seems taken in by Rasputin's claims of divine powers to a certain degree, raising a great deal of skepticism. Far too much credence is given to suppositions that Rasputin wielded very little influence over the tsar and tsarina aside from Alexei's health.

I like reading Greg King's books as he has a wonderfully engaging writing style, but at times he tends to play fast and . This book focuses on Prince Felix Youssoupov who it is believed was most instrumental in that murder

I like reading Greg King's books as he has a wonderfully engaging writing style, but at times he tends to play fast and loose with the facts. This book focuses on Prince Felix Youssoupov who it is believed was most instrumental in that murder. It was interesting to learn more about this man and I was amazed at the wealth he commanded, and of course lost in the revolution.

The Man Who Killed Rasputin: Prince Felix Youssoupov and the Murder That Helped Bring Down the Russian Empire, 1996. The Duchess of Windsor: The Uncommon Life of Wallis Simpson, 1999. Sharon Tate and the Manson murders, 2000. The Fate of the Romanovs, co-authored with Penny Wilson, 2003. The Court of the Last Tsar: Pomp, Power and Pageantry in the Reign of Nicholas II, 2006. Gilded Prism: The Konstantinovichi Grand Dukes & the Last Years of the Romanov Dynasty, with Penny Wilson, 2006. Twilight of Splendor: The Court of Queen Victoria During Her Diamond Jubilee Year, 2007.

The Man Who Killed Rasputin: Prince Felix Youssoupov and the Murder That Helped Bring Down the Russian Empire by Greg King (297 pages, 1995)-nonfiction. I have long been interested in the final years of the Romanov reign. Years ago I read all the standard books on them.

com User, October 21, 1998. Greg King tells a great story, from the sordid affairs and intricacies of the European aristocracy to the history of that era.

The Man Who Killed Rasputin : Prince Felix Youssoupov and the Murder That Helped Bring down the Russian Empire. com User, October 21, 1998. Rasputin's death and life reads like fiction. The details of Youssoupov's life pre and post Rasputin draw interesting parallels between the killer and his victim. On par with Massie's "Romanovs: The Final Chapter".

The Man Who Killed Rasputin. Price Felix Youssoupov and the Murder That Helped Bring Down the Russian Empire. New York: Hippocene Books, Inc. Leach, Paul R. 1930. New York: Citadel Press. Chicago: Reilly & Lee Co. Lebergott, Stanley.

The Man Who Killed Rasputin: Prince Felix Youssoupov and the Murder That Helped Bring Down the Russian . She and her immediate family were all killed while in Bolshevik captivity in 1918, during the Russian Revolution. She was later canonized in 2000 in the Russian Orthodox Church as Saint Alexandra the Passion Bearer. Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna of Russia was the second daughter of Tsar Nicholas II, the last monarch of Russia, and of Tsarina Alexandra. She was born at the Peterhof, Saint Petersburg.

And The Murder That Helped Bring Down The Russian Empire. Top rear corner lightly bumped ISBN: 1559722959 (Rasputin, Grigori, Russia, Court And Courtiers).

The Man Who Killed Rasputin: Prince Felix Youssoupov And The Murder That Helped Bring Down The Russian Empire. The Man Who Killed Rasputin: Prince Felix Youssoupov And The Murder That Helped Bring Down The Russian Empire. New York: Birch Lane Press, 1995. Quite the contrary, after the official version is presented in chapter 15, King reports alternate versions in chapter 16.

Drawing on newly revealed documents from the St. Petersburg police files and containing many previously unseen photographs, a suspenseful recreation of the plot to murder Rasputin chronicles the life of Felix Youssoupov, a Russian nobleman who led the murderers.
Great and very interesting with many details about Prince Felix and Princess Irina's lives A very easy informative book
I love anything about Russian history. This was a very good book.
King's scholarship is severely in question in this book. Many of his claims about both Rasputin and Yusupov are mixtures of conjecture, pop-psychology, and pseudo-mysticism. In some cases, they're downright libelous.

Too bad Felix Yusupov isn't alive to sue him, too. (As he did both MGM and CBS).

King makes claims that cannot in any way be substantiated, but he presents them as truth, as allegations, and as innuendoes. The book comes across as an apologists attempt to paint Rasputin in a good light and to brand Yusupov as some kind of insane sex-criminal.

King even maintains that Rasputin could actually heal!

In most of the rest, he just re-quotes other sources. I know that stealing from more than one source is research, not plagiarism, but the only new insights into the events are from King's imagination.

Read it as fiction, not as fact. Yusupov might not have told the complete truth in his memoirs, but you can't take this book as fact either.
I like reading Greg King's books as he has a wonderfully engaging writing style, but at times he tends to play fast and loose with the facts. In "The Man Who Killed Rasputin", he seems taken in by Rasputin's claims of divine powers to a certain degree, raising a great deal of skepticism. Far too much credence is given to suppositions that Rasputin wielded very little influence over the tsar and tsarina aside from Alexei's health. While I'll concede the point Rasputin probably did not have as much influence as people believed, to dismiss his influence entirely is ridiculous. King also dismisses several theories concerning Rasputin's "healing powers" and concluding only for the mystical, completely disregarding the possibility several factors were in play.

I agree when King says "we will never know with any certainty the true nature of the events of that night at the Moika Palace", but the source for crucial pieces of his "evidence" is shoddy at best. A story he heard from someone who heard it from the sister-in-law of one of Felix's servants. Really? I can't believe he had the nerve to quote this in a serious history book. The information is more than second-hand. It's third or fourth-hand.

I appreciate the consideration of different hypothesis, but don't couch it as fact.

And I did find a blatant discrepancy, though on a relatively minor matter. At one point King states that Felix inherited his father's golden hair and then a few pages later states Felix's brother had the same dark hair as their father. It's either one or the other. The senior Yusopov did not have both.

King also deduces Grand Duke Dmitri Pavlovich's homosexuality from a letter written by Alexandra to Nicholas, taking a great deal of liberty in inferring a meaning correlating to his theory. Again, I appreciate the hypothesis, but why infer it as positive fact? I have read a great many books about the Romanovs and don't recall any claiming Grand Duke Dmitri was a homosexual. Of course, some were read years ago and I may be mistaken. But it did not ring a bell at all. All I remember concerning the Grand Duke's "love affairs" was the fact he was considered as a match for Maria or Olga at one point before being involved in Rasputin's murder. And we also learn in this book that Dmitri had an extended romantic relationship with Coco Chanel. I suppose I should read the memoirs of Maria Pavlovna, his sister, and get her take on the matter.

All in all, an entertaining and fairly quick read that offers new and interesting hypotheses on the night of Rasputin's murder.
An absolutely beautiful book with interesting photos. The book is so well-written, that the characters in pre-revolutionary Russia come to life and one gets a feeling of the "hardship" Felix and Irina endured when in exile. It is astounding that a "mad" monk could have such an influence over the tsarina and her imperial court. Personally, I admire Prince Felix Youssoupov for taking such a drastic action in those troubled times. After reading this book, I bought his book "Lost Splendour" which gives generally a very good impression of what life was like in pre-revolutionary Russia and there are some funny chapters in it as well. It ends with the tragic exile from Yalta sailing towards the unknown.
The author does a wonderful job of separating the myths and the truth concerning the lives of the "Mad Monk" Rasputin and his killer, Felix Youssoupov. Rich in detail, I felt like I was in Tsarist Russia, watching the dramatic events as they unfolded. Recommended reading for any history buff.
The author purports to be a historian and scholar but this book shows he is neither. It is full of "Grigori Rasputin good," and "Prince Felix Felixovich Yusupov bad." Yusupov knew Rasputin's motives and knew Rasputin was intrumental in bringing down the Tzar and the murder of his family by the Bolshevichs. The author of this book doesn't bother to provide evidence for his claims. He literally makes things up as he goes along. It is astonishing this book obtained publication. However, when one considers the slop being published today, it should probably be no surprise it came into print. The author glosses over several obvious facts. For example, as the predominent number of extant Rasputin photos show, Rasputin was a freemason. Secondly, Rasputin is a well known charlatan who was arrested many times for defrauding the public. That is why he left Siberia. Moreover, Rasputin, as freemason, was a spy for the Bolshevichs. Much of the "healing" was a charade engineered by Rasputin himself in order to gain the confidence of the Tzar's circle and documented by several sources at the time. The author mentions none of these facts. In fact, the author is nothing more than a revisionist historian who wants to rewrite history the way he feels it should be rather than the way it is. In short, the author is a buffoon. He is as credible a scholar as Rasputin is a faithhealer. The author is an imbecile.
And the book isn't too bad, either