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Flames in the Field: Story of Four SOE Agents in Occupied France epub

by Rita Kramer


Flames in the Field: Story of Four SOE Agents in Occupied France epub

ISBN: 0718138813

ISBN13: 978-0718138813

Author: Rita Kramer

Category: History

Subcategory: Military

Language: English

Publisher: Michael Joseph Ltd; First edition (March 30, 1995)

Pages: 352 pages

ePUB book: 1759 kb

FB2 book: 1272 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 471

Other Formats: mbr lrf mobi lit





Ms Rita Kramer’s Flames in the Field is a solid if occasionally stodgy .

Ms Rita Kramer’s Flames in the Field is a solid if occasionally stodgy history of England’s Secret Operations Executive (SOE) in World War II occupied France. Reading this book led me to later read some of the other classic SOE histories and narratives, like The White Rabbit, Maquisard, and . The story of the resistance movements in the occupied countries still has not received the attention it deserves, particularly with respect to how the Resistance helped the D-Day landings succeed by hindering the German heavy divisions from reaching Normandy until the Allies were established in their beachheads.

In this excellent book, author Rita Kramer focuses on the female agent saboteurs who were recruited, trained and parachuted in to France in the complex and highly secret operations of the British Special Operations Executive. Naturally, given the high risk of such operations, many of these agents were compromised, discovered and captured by the Germans. Done in by those all too human traits vanity, arrogance, affection, trust, and just too common incompetence and stupidity.

From the Preface to Flames in the Field: January 20, 1988. 6 February 88. Dear Mrs. Kramer

From the Preface to Flames in the Field: January 20, 1988. I will tell you how I come to be writing to you and with what purpose in mind. Kramer. It gave me the opportunity to judge the quality of your writing and your attitude to some problems of today.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Flames in the Field: Story of Four . Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear.

Minimal damage to the book cover eg. The majority of pages are undamaged with some creasing or tearing, and pencil underlining of text, but this is minimal. No highlighting of text, no writing in the margins, and no missing pages.

Flames in the Field : The Story of Four SOE Agents in Occupied France.

The true story of women agents of the secret World War II Special Operations Executive, mandated by Winston Churchill to set Europe ablaze by organizing resistance in occupied Europe during the prelude to D Day. Intrigue and heroism, adventure and betrayal figure in this.

You can reading Flames in the Field: The Story of. .We furnish utter release of this ebook.

You can reading Flames in the Field: The Story of Four SOE Agents in Occupied France online by Rita Kramer either load. Additionally to this ebook, on our site you may read instructions and. 5 different artistic ebooks online, or downloading theirs. We will draw on your consideration what our site does not store the ebook itself, but we grant reference to site wherever you can downloading either read online.

Rita Kramer's previous books include Maria Montessori: A Biography, At Tender Age, Ed School Follies, and When Morning Comes. She lives in New York City. Shipping: US$ . 9 Within .

the story of four SOE agents in occupied France. Published 1995 by M. Joseph, Viking Penguin in London, New York, .

Eugene Leigh would live in France through the first two plus years of World War I returning occasionally to the United States . Flames in the Field: The Story of Four SOE Agents in Occupied France (2008) Penguin Books, UK. ISBN 978-0-14-024423-6.

Eugene Leigh would live in France through the first two plus years of World War I returning occasionally to the United States to purchase bloodstock. He and his family relocated to the United States in early 1917 where he took over as manager of the thirty-two-horse stable of Edward B. McLean, owner of the Washington Post newspaper. Not long after the end of the War, Eugene Leigh returned to France where he became manager and trainer for the racing stable owned by Pierre Wertheimer.

This is the true story of four women, members of the Special Operations Executive (SOE), who were sent into Nazi-occupied France during World War II, and then caught up in a web of deception which resulted in their deaths at the hands of the Gestapo. In this book, Rita Kramer pieces together the women's stories, how they came to be involved in such a dangerous operation as well as their experiences in France, and also analyzes the controversial methods of SOE at a crucial period in the war.
The stories of British agents sent to France during World War II have always intrigued me. I decided to buy and read this book after watching a documentary about the SOE. A recent visit to Dachau also encouraged my interest. Imagine my surprise when I read the first paragraph and stopped dead when I discovered that the "Bas Rhin" area of France was in WESTERN France. Maybe the author meant western Germany? This is the type of error that should not get by with proper editing and proofing. Additionally, throughout the book, MI5 and MI6 were printed as M15 and M16. I do not understand the process of making a print book into an e-book, so perhaps errors of this type occur during that transformation? Anyone who read the print version may not find that error.

The author obviously had a passion for her subject, but her writing style slowed my reading of the book in the beginning. Multiple thoughts and ideas would be expressed in one long sentence. There is nothing inherently wrong with that. But after three or four commas or semi-colons, it was easy to lose the train of thought. Once I became accustomed to her style, it became a bit easier to read.

The author expressed in the preface that there would be a mixed chronology and sometimes this was distracting as well. I would become interested in a character or story in one chapter, but the next chapter would go unexpectedly to another time or place or character. But Ms Kramer did warn her readers not all stories would be told in their entirety and that she alone chose how to present the material.

As far as the content of the book, I found the background on the SOE agents to be fascinating. The interwoven stories of the SOE agents, French resistance members, and the Free French agents was particularly interesting as I learned more about how they worked - or didn't work - together. It was particularly chilling to read about how the Nazis "hijacked" many wireless operators. I have seen movies that touched on this as well as other books I have read in the past. The references to the incessant internecine squabbling between MI6 and SOE and DeGaulle's Free French makes you wonder how the Allies won the war.

For months, I have postponed reading a comprehensive history of the "dark years" in France during the Nazi occupation. After reading this book about the four unfortunate SOE agents executed at Natzweiler-Struthof, I finally picked it up and began reading. Someone described the Nazi occupation of France as a "gray" period, where there was no real black and white. People went along to get along, albeit some more enthusiastically than others. From our vantage point it is far too easy to point fingers or tsk-tsk about the actions people took during the Nazi occupation, but I cannot say what I would have done myself. My better nature wants to tell me I would have resisted, I would have volunteered to be an agent, I would not have submitted. But I will never know so I must settle for reading, with great admiration, about those who did.

I would recommend this book as a good starting point for others interested in stories of this nature. The sheer amount of information, along with the references and bibliography, gives you so many places to go to learn more about this compelling and engrossing period in history.
“Secret Agent Man…the odds are he won’t live to see tomorrow.” (from a popular 70s TV show and song by “Agent Orange”) but these “secret agents” were women. In this excellent book, author Rita Kramer focuses on the female agent saboteurs who were recruited, trained and parachuted in to France in the complex and highly secret operations of the British “Special Operations Executive”. Naturally, given the high risk of such operations, many of these agents were compromised, discovered and captured by the Germans. Done in by those all too human traits vanity, arrogance, affection, trust, and just too common incompetence and stupidity.

This book is well researched and a highly readable but complex account of the experiences of four specific women agents. The tale is told within the overall context of SOE operations that brings the reader considerable background and context.

Several books have been written about the operations of the British Special Operations
Executive (SOE), an English clandestine organization established to send agents in to occupied France during WW II. Each new book seems to peel back a layer of mystery and intrigue only to reveal yet another layer covering yet more unknowns.

The prospective reader should be alerted to the fact that the organization, operation and history of SOE is a bit murky and remains a morass. The history is controversial in part, because the recollections of the surviving participants are often divergent in the details. And, also because of the politically sensitive and secret nature of the entire SOE business. Ms Kramer does an excellent job of capturing and explaining the subtle and complex organizational issues surrounding SOE during it’s operation in wartime England and France. For example, in explaining the deep political and cultural divisions between SOE F Section, MI6 and de Gaulle’s Free French without detracting from the narrative. As she says; “to untangle the various threads of the F Section disasters.” An incredibly complex undertaking it turns out.

Interested readers should also consult “Death Be Not Proud” by Elizabeth Nicholas, Jean Overton Fuller’s book “Double Webs”, (cited references) and a very excellent book “All the Kings Men” by Robert Marshall. The later is an up to date version of perfidy, intrigue and high stakes in the SOE, suggesting that SOE itself, its operations and its agents were apparently considered expendable in the greater purpose of deceiving the Germans and concealing the details of the Normandy invasion. Were SOE operations mere subterfuge in a much grander game or a jumble of incompetence and laxity? Serious history, indeed.

Be forewarned, the business of spies and saboteurs is brutal, ugly and unforgiving and so too is a well done book on the history of the SOE.
I've been on a WW2 jag lately and cannot get enough about these absolutely incredibly brave men and, especially, women who joined the Resistance, gave up everything they had or ever possibly might have to fight against the worst tyrant in modern history that being, of course, Adolf Hitler.
One of the reasons I have for garnering this information through several brilliantly written and thoroughly researched books is to build up a library of resources for my grandchildren who are not going to be taught this critical aspect of history in their schools....and they all attend excellent private schools that are dedicated to excellence. However, much of what we learn we have to dig up on our own.
This particular book---along with several others I will post----is stellar. It is fully researched and succinctly written and provides a vivid reminder of what can happen if good men and women choose to do nothing or decide to look away when faced with evil.
One hopes that one's own children and grandchildren will never have to make the choices that these good people had to make but if that day ever comes, I pray that mine would have such courage.

Other Five Star books on this subject :

Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue (Women of Action)

Odette: World War Two's Darling Spy

A Life in Secrets: Vera Atkins and the Missing Agents of WWII

SOE and The Resistance: As told in The Times Obituaries