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The Ottoman Age of Exploration epub

by Giancarlo Casale


The Ottoman Age of Exploration epub

ISBN: 0199874042

ISBN13: 978-0199874040

Author: Giancarlo Casale

Category: History

Subcategory: Middle East

Language: English

Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (December 1, 2011)

Pages: 304 pages

ePUB book: 1826 kb

FB2 book: 1383 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 864

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Giancarlo Casale's book on the Ottomans in the sixteenth century accomplishes just that.

Giancarlo Casale's book on the Ottomans in the sixteenth century accomplishes just that. His arguments are sure to spawn interesting debate and will also find their way into classrooms, providing scholars and students confirmation that the Ottomans were agents of change in the Indian Ocean and its spice trade. -Kathy Callahan, World History Bulletin. Start reading The Ottoman Age of Exploration on your Kindle in under a minute.

Giancarlo Casale is Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World and the 2009-2011 McKnight Land Grant Professor at the University of Minnesota.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Giancarlo Casale is Assistant Professor of the History of the Islamic World and the 2009-2011 McKnight Land Grant Professor at the University of Minnesota. Библиографические данные. The Ottoman Age of Exploration. Oxford University Press, 2010.

The Ottoman age of exploration, Giancarlo Casale. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-0-19-537782-8. Specically, it is an essential tenet of this book that before the Age of Exploration began, the Ottoman Empire had virtually no meaningful contact with the Indian Ocean-a part of the world that was, despite a deeply rooted indigenous Muslim presence, nevertheless as remote and unfamiliar to the Ottomans as it was to.

In his chronologically organized book, Casale not only seeks to introduce the Ottomans as global players engaged in geographical . As Casale also acknowledges, sparse Ottoman sources should be backed by European ones.

As Casale also acknowledges, sparse Ottoman sources should be backed by European ones.

Casale’s angle in The Ottoman Age of Exploration is bold and thought provoking. The book is so cluttered, and the clutter obscures Casale’s smart ideas about the Ottomans, their orientation toward the rest of the world and their place in global systems. The Ottoman mindset when it came to the Indian Ocean world was remarkably similar to the western European mindset.

In 1517, the Ottoman Sultan Selim "the Grim" conquered Egypt and brought his empire for the first time in history into direct contact with the trading world of the Indian Ocean. During the decades that followed, the Ottomans became progressively more engaged in the affairs of this vast and previously unfamiliar region, eventually to the point of launching a systematic ideological, military and commercial challenge to the Portuguese Empire, their main rival for control of the lucrative trade routes of maritime Asia.

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Home Browse Books Book details, The Ottoman Age of Exploration. In 1517, the Ottoman Sultan Selim "the Grim" conquered Egypt and brought his empire for the first time in history into direct contact with the trading world of the Indian Ocean.

Автор: Giancarlo Casale Название: The Ottoman Age of Exploration Издательство: Oxford Academ .

Pinto focuses on the distinct tradition of maps known collectively as the Book of Roads and Kingdoms (Kitab al-Masalik wa al-Mamalik, or KMMS), examining them from three distinct angles-iconography, context, and patronage.

In 1517, the Ottoman Sultan Selim "the Grim" conquered Egypt and brought his empire for the first time in history into direct contact with the trading world of the Indian Ocean. During the decades that followed, the Ottomans became progressively more engaged in the affairs of this vast and previously unfamiliar region, eventually to the point of launching a systematic ideological, military and commercial challenge to the Portuguese Empire, their main rival for control of the lucrative trade routes of maritime Asia.The Ottoman Age of Exploration is the first comprehensive historical account of this century-long struggle for global dominance, a struggle that raged from the shores of the Mediterranean to the Straits of Malacca, and from the interior of Africa to the steppes of Central Asia. Based on extensive research in the archives of Turkey and Portugal, as well as materials written on three continents and in a half dozen languages, it presents an unprecedented picture of the global reach of the Ottoman state during the sixteenth century. It does so through a dramatic recounting of the lives of sultans and viziers, spies, corsairs, soldiers-of-fortune, and women from the imperial harem. Challenging traditional narratives of Western dominance, it argues that the Ottomans were not only active participants in the Age of Exploration, but ultimately bested the Portuguese in the game of global politics by using sea power, dynastic prestige, and commercial savoir faire to create their own imperial dominion throughout the Indian Ocean.
Great story-telling! Easy to read historical account of a well-known period but a completely unknown subject: Ottoman in the Indian Ocean and how the Ottoman position against the Portuguese informed, not only strategic geographic strongholds but also leadership transitions within the Ottoman State. The parts I enjoyed the most were specifically about key individuals and their rise to power positions via their networks, e.g. Grand Vizier Ibrahim Pasha who was in fact born in Venice and was able to use his Venetian connections to kick start an Ottoman navy to sail out in the Indian Ocean.
the ottoman empire is my area of chief interest...and i have read many many books on the topic....and in this one i discovered a new aspect of ottoman history that i have been exposed to before...well written and keeps your attention...bravo
Casale offers a refreshing view of an otherwise neglected period of exploration. While historians often focus on the accomplishments of Europeans starting in the 16th century, Casale focuses on the Ottoman Age of Exploration (as the title suggests). This is definitely worth a read for those interested in World History.
Easy to read and interesting, I was reading chapters ahead of where we were in class and continued reading past the required pages. It really sucks you in and holds your attention. Loved it!
The story of the Ottoman entry should be better known.
Great book; met the author at a lecture, very knowledgeable and easy to talk to.
I wanted a history of the Ottoman Empire. This book started the story from the 14th and 15th centuries when the Empire was fighting the Protuguese for domination of the spice trade in the Indian Ocean area. It was interesting reading, although not what I was looking for.
I thoroughly enjoyed this volume, finishing it in a little over a week (aided, admittedly, by the fact that I spent half of that time on a long weekend at a seaside resort where the weather was unseasonably chilly and wet). It is well-written and was handsomely produced by the Oxford University Press, with more than twenty carefully selected illustrations that help the reader to correctly envision the warships of the Turks and Portuguese and the trading ports and fortresses of the Indian Ocean during the sixteenth century. There are also four useful but cartographically basic maps that help the reader to place the location of the ports and battles discussed.

To the extent that most western readers know anything substantial about the Ottoman Empire in the sixteenth century, we tend to think of it as a Mediterranean and Balkan power, gradually gobbling up the remaining Christian fortresses along the coasts of Greece and Cyprus while also pushing north up the Danube Valley. But Casale's book reminds us that the Empire's growth in western Asia and north Africa during the first four decades of the sixteenth century was even more explosive.

In 1517, the Empire's eastern frontier ran across Asia Minor from roughly the Taursus Mountains in the south to Trebizond in the north. In that year, the Ottoman Sultan Selim "the Grim" went to war against the Mamluk Sultanate, another Islamic power that had dominated the eastern Mediterranean since the final defeat and expulsion of the crusaders two centuries earlier. Selim's army made short work of the Mamluks, incorporating their possessions in Syria, Palestine and Egypt into his empire and thereby more than doubling its size in less than a year. In 1534, the Ottomans seized Iraq from the Safavid rulers of Persia, acquiring a foothold on the Persian Gulf at Basra, and four years later they extended their conquests to Yemen, thereby securing the northern gate to the Red Sea.

These moves brought the Ottomans into contact and then conflict with the Portuguese, who first reached India in their carracks and caravels at the very end of the fifteenth century. Within a decade, the Portuguese began to establish a string of fortresses along its western coast and went to war with the Mamluk Empire. Casale suggests that their dual objective was to enrich themselves and impoverish the Mamluks by seizing control of the East Indian spice trade. They believed that accomplishing these objectives would make possible a renewed crusade that would recover the Holy Land and secure the shorter trade route from the Mediterranean across the isthmus of Suez, down the Red Sea, and then across the Indian Ocean.

As Casale makes clear, the Ottomans likewise coveted the riches produced by the spice trade - pepper from India and Ceylon, cinnamon, cloves and camphor from the East Indies. They also had a religious-ideological objective of their own: that of ensuring the safe passage of Moslem pilgrims from India and the Indies to the Arabian holy cities of Mecca and Medina, and of protecting the holy cities themselves against possible attack by Portuguese forces sailing up the Red Sea. This great power competition between the Ottomans and the Portuguese for control of the Indian Ocean trade routes lasted from 1525-1589.

Casale's account of this long-running conflict is dramatic and vividly presented. As he summarizes an early phase of the Ottoman-Portuguese wars:

"[The years] from 1538 to 1546[] had been a period of bitter and almost continuous warfare between Istanbul and Lisbon, conducted across an enormous area spanning the full breadth of the Indian Ocean. On the high seas, Ottoman corsairs and their Muslim allies had faced off against the Portuguese fleet, staging coordinated attacks in theaters of operations from south India to the Arabian coast. In the Horn of Africa and in Southeast Asia, elite units of Ottoman and Portuguese musketeers - the sixteenth-century equivalent of commandos - had locked horns in guerrilla wars to prop up friendly local regimes and to destabilize their rivals. And from their main bases of supply in Suez and Goa, both sides had launched massive armadas, consisting of thousands of men and dozens of ships, against each other's most important maritime redoubts in Egypt and India."

Casale ably recounts the major strokes and counterstrokes launched by each side - the Ottoman expedition against Diu in India in 1538, the retaliatory Portuguese attack on Suez in 1541, the Ottoman attempts to reduce the Portuguese fortress of Hormuz at the mouth of the Persian Gulf in the 1550's, and the effort by the Ottoman corsair Mir Ali in 1589 to develop the island city of Mombasa as an advanced base from which to extend Ottoman power far south along the Swahili coast of east Africa. The latter expedition went disastrously awry when a marauding (and allegedly cannibalistic) army of 20,000 Zimba warriors suddenly appeared from out of the continent's interior at exactly the wrong moment.

My only quibbles with Casale's book are that it would have been helpful if he had provided a little more detail on the origins and growth of Portugal's Indian Ocean Empire by way of background. And (perhaps understandably in light of the book's focus, as evidenced by its title) the opposing Portuguese leaders remain shadowy, in contrast to the colorful succession of Ottoman corsairs and grand viziers who dominate his account. Also, to the extent the book's title may lead you to expect accounts of Ottoman explorations of lands previously unknown to Europeans comparable to those of the Spanish, French, and British in the New World, you won't find that here. Portuguese seafarers and Moslem merchants had already trailblazed the path to India and the Indies; this book is about the commercial, military and diplomatic competition between the Portuguese and the Ottomans that resulted.