» » Manners Custom And Dress During The Middle Ages And During The Renaissance Period

Manners Custom And Dress During The Middle Ages And During The Renaissance Period epub

by Paul Lacroix


Manners Custom And Dress During The Middle Ages And During The Renaissance Period epub

ISBN: 1414290462

ISBN13: 978-1414290461

Author: Paul Lacroix

Category: History

Subcategory: Europe

Language: English

Publisher: Indypublish.Com (July 31, 2004)

Pages: 376 pages

ePUB book: 1509 kb

FB2 book: 1359 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 820

Other Formats: mbr rtf mobi lit





The Project Gutenberg EBook of Manners, Custom and Dress During the Middle .

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Manners, Custom and Dress During the Middle Ages and During the Renaissance Period, by Paul Lacroix. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. The Manners and Customs of the Middle Ages:-this subject is of the greatest interest, not only to the man of science, but to the man of the world also. In it, too, "we retrace not only one single period, but two periods quite distinct one from the other. It is a subject we have chosen to succeed our first book, and which will be followed by a similar study on the various aspects of Religious and Military Life.

Содержание: Condition of Persons and Lands. Privileges and Rights (Feudal and Municipal).

Although society during the Middle Ages was, as a whole, closely cemented together, being animated by the same sentiments and imbued with the same spirit, it was divided, as we have already stated, into three great classes, namely, the clergy, the nobility, and the liers-etat. These classes, each of which formed a distinct body within the State, carried on an existence peculiar to itself, and presented in its collective capacity a separate individuality. Hence there was a distinct ceremonial for each class.

Fac simile of a miniature from the Breviary of the Cardinal Grimani, attributed to Memling. From a copy in the possession of M. Ambroise Firmin Didot. Continue reading book . Stream audiobook and download chapters.

The online text of the book has over 400 contemporary illustrations. Warning: Sections 27 and 28, Punishments, may be disturbing to those of a sensitive disposition. Summary by Ruth Golding). This is a Librivox recording. org/ As a member of the partnership program, I earn from purchases that meet the requirements.

during a reign of fourteen years, continued to waste the public money. A short time previous to his death he acknowledged his errors, but continued to spend money, without consideration or restraint, in all kinds of extravagances, but especially in buildings. During his reign the annual expenditure almost invariably doubled the revenue. In 1492 it reached 7,300,000 francs, about 244,000,000 francs of present money

The Project Gutenberg text of the book has over 400 illustrations.

The Project Gutenberg text of the book has over 400 illustrations. For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox. Download M4B Part 1 (135MB) Download M4B Part 2 (137MB) Download M4B Part 3 (144MB) Download M4B Part 4 (59MB).

Manners, Custom and Dress During the Middle Ages and During the Renaissance Period. By Paul Lacroix (Bibliophile Jacob), Curator of the Imperial Library of the Arsenal, Paris. Illustrated with Nineteen Chromolithographic Prints by F. Kellerhoven and upwards of Four Hundred Engravings on Wood. To understand the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, it is necessary to go back to the source of its art, and to know the life of our fathers; these are two inseparable things, which entwine one another, and become complete one by the other.

The Manners and Customs of the Middle Ages:-this subject is of the greatest interest, not only to the man of. .Costumes of the Fifteenth Century. Table of Illustrations. 5 Manners, Customs, and Dress During the Middle Ages, and During the Renaissance Period, by Paul Lacroix.

The Manners and Customs of the Middle Ages:-this subject is of the greatest interest, not only to the man of science, but to the man of the world also. In the first, the public and private customs offer a curious mixture of barbarism and civilisation. 3. Louis XII. leaving Alexandria, on the 24th April, 1507, to chastise the City of Genoa. From a Miniature in the "Voyage de Gênes" of Jean Marot.

An encompassing background of the Middle Ages and Renaissance period is presented in this work. It cover both the elite and the peasants looking at among other things customs, living and work conditions, food, dress, and religion. It gives a good overview and is an interesting addition to the library of anyone interested in the history of Europe during these periods.

First published in 1876, this scholarly work has the details I was looking for about everyday life in late antiquity and the middle ages, particularly in France. Those details are so hard to find in more recent books, which tend to specialize either in high-level political manuvering, or certain segments of society (slaves, saints, women, children, etc.). In contrast, this book comprehensively covers life-and-style topics such as food and cookery, hunting, games and pastimes, commerce, guilds and trade corporations, law and justice, ceremonies, costumes, and more.

Of course, in the last 137 years, certain perceptions and attitudes about this time period have evolved and not all academics today would necessarily agree with everything presented here. But, if you are at all familiar with those debates, you can set those differences aside while reading this and be left with a great wealth of information about exactly what the title advertises: manners, customs and dress.

In other words, how did people of the time look, act, behave, and live? Not just the royals, nobles, or religious, but at all levels of society? This book has details I have not found anywhere else - from the climate control systems of Frankish palaces (supposedly they were heated or cooled depending on the season by hot or cold water pipes in the walls that also furnished the downstairs baths) to the fact that butchers were one of the best paid professionals and the slaughterhouse in Paris dated back to ancient times before the Roman empire.

Another treasure this book has to offer: hundreds of illustrations from replications of prints and wooden engravings.
This book is a wonderful source for those of you who like history (history of Europe, Medieval food, fashion, minorities etc.) or you need reference for your thesis or essay.
The survey is written by Paul Lacroix (Jacob) and discusses the representative aspects of the Middle Ages and Renaissance: Conditions of Persons and Lands, Privileges and Rights (Feudal or Municipal), Private Life in the Castles, the Towns and the Rural Districts, Food and Cookery, Hunting, Games and Pastime, Commerce, Guilds and Trade Corporations, Taxes, Money and Finances, Law and the Administration of Justice, Sacred Tribunals, Punishments, Jews, Gipsies, Tramps, Beggars and Cours des Miracles, Ceremonials and Costumes.
The author writes most of all about France - from the Pre-Roman and Roman period to the seventeen century - but also about Germany, Italy, Spain and so on. The information is very dense and the examples are supported by quotes from the chronicles of the time. Unfortunately, this Kinfle Edition does not allow the reader to see the illustrations.
If you don't know much about the period culture, this 120-year-old book can lead you badly astray with WAY out-of-date Victorian constructions of the time. I mean, "Gates of Hell" sideless surcoat interpreted as a gown with a kind of external corset is the big flashing red light.

That said, if you ignore his interpretations, he is a mine of great original stuff. Start there with the hundreds illustrations reproducing original period art. Then add all the minutiae he pulls out of period authors on what the peasants ate and when, as well as noble life, what games people played and what Lent really meant. Add to this that for a change it's about life in France, rather than England in the period. In English we are over-surfeited with info on the English and rarely find Continental information, when England was this weirdly centralized place on the periphery and the French feudality far more "normal."

Get yourself settled with some good modern books, then dig through this for the unusual bits.
I recently read two books back-to-back about the Middle Ages; this one and "The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England". While I recommend reading both books, I was actually pleasantly surprised to find that this book turned out to be the more enjoyable read. I think the reason is because the information (1) flowed smoother, (2) was better organized, and (3) was described in simpler language.

This book covers a lot of topics, most of which were fascinating. I read the Kindle edition, which included long "lists" of illustrations. However, it appears that the printed book has the actual illustrations, because there were not any in the Kindle edition. I am sure that I would have enjoyed the book even more, had I been able to see the illustrations. However, in spite of this one flaw, the book is still worthwhile reading. So, don't be put off by this one issue.

This book serves as a good starting point if you want to learn some basic information about medieval customs, dress, food, manners, etc. It is great for novices like me who want to know more about medival lifestyles but who don't have an extensive background already on medieval "things. The problem, I felt, with the "Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England" was that the text sometimes became bogged down in medieval jargan and historical referrences. While this book might not offer much in terms of new information for long-time Middle-Age scholars and experts, it does give some good, solid information in an enjoyable and easy-to-understand format.

Also, please note that the book is an English translation from French, so it reads a bit awkward in places. Another downside was the large number of typographical errors that were annoying, such as "receipt" for "recipe". Regardless of the these negative points, I still recommend this book, giving it two thumbs-up.
A great deficit in this book were the references to many figures and illustration in the original book but were not included in the kindle version. A second difficulty was the very formal style of writing. Obviously, this book was written long ago. The language made for a slow reading pace. On a positive note, this was obviously a copied version of the original book so mistakes on spelling and formatting were few in number.