» » What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew

What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew epub

by Daniel Pool


What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew epub

ISBN: 1854878751

ISBN13: 978-1854878755

Author: Daniel Pool

Category: History

Subcategory: Europe

Language: English

Publisher: Robinson Publishing (1998)

Pages: 411 pages

ePUB book: 1334 kb

FB2 book: 1197 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 572

Other Formats: azw mbr azw lit





This book grew from a wish to answer some of the questions that nag any half-curious reader of the great nineteenth-century English novels, those sometimes daunting but enjoyable works of Dickens, Jane Austen, the Brontës, or Trollope.

This book grew from a wish to answer some of the questions that nag any half-curious reader of the great nineteenth-century English novels, those sometimes daunting but enjoyable works of Dickens, Jane Austen, the Brontës, or Trollope. Today’s reader is apt to find himself or herself puzzling over references to aspects of everyday English life that are now long vanished but that the contemporary author took for granted that ience knew.

Author Daniel Pool provides countless intriguing details (did you know that the "plums" in Christmas plum pudding . I am a huge fan of Jane Austen and I enjoy reading the works of Charles Dickens.

Author Daniel Pool provides countless intriguing details (did you know that the "plums" in Christmas plum pudding were actually raisins?) on the Church of England, sex, Parliament, dinner parties, country house visiting, and a host of other aspects of nineteenth-century English life-both "upstairs" and "downstairs. I know most people enjoy and would say Pride and Prejudice, but Emma is more up my alley. As far as the works of Charles Dickens, I would have to say A Christmas Carol, Great Expectations and David Copperfield.

Author Daniel Pool provides countless intriguing details (did you know that the plums in Christmas plum . Daniel Pool received a doctorate in political science from Brandeis University and a law degree from Columbia University. He lives in New York City. Библиографические данные.

Author Daniel Pool provides countless intriguing details (did you know that the plums in Christmas plum pudding were actually raisins?) on the Church of England, sex, Parliament, dinner parties, country house visiting, and a host of other aspects of nineteenth-century English life-both upstairs and downstairs. What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew: From Fox Hunting to Whist-the Facts of Daily Life in Nineteenth-Century England.

Author Daniel Pool provides countless intriguing details (did you know that . Much of Jane Austen’s novels was set in the counties not far north and south of London. This book grew from a wish to answer some of the questions that nag any half-curious reader of the great nineteenth-century English novels, those sometimes daunting but enjoyable works of Dickens, Jane Austen, the Brontës, or Trollope.

Jane Austen's England: Daily Life in the Georgian and Regency Periods by. .When they do, this book will be indispensable

When they do, this book will be indispensable. Daniel Pool's delightful "What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew" is a fascinating attempt to close the knowledge gap about the facts of daily life in 19th Century England. In a series of short topical essays and an extended glossary of key terms, Pool examines some relevant facts about the 19th Century.

This book answers many questions about life in England in the 19th Century. My one criticism of the book is the absence of maps and illustrations, particularly in the section on London

This book answers many questions about life in England in the 19th Century. What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew is a terrific book to accompany the reading of nineteenth-century English novels. My one criticism of the book is the absence of maps and illustrations, particularly in the section on London. A series of maps would have made Pool’s explanation of the changes that took place during the century more comprehensible. As it was, not being very familiar with London, I found myself a little lost.

Author Daniel Pool provides countless intriguing details (did you know . A delightful reader’s companion (The New York Times) to the great nineteenth-century British novels of Austen, Dickens, Trollope, the Brontës, and more, this lively guide clarifies the sometimes bizarre maze of rules and customs that governed life in Victorian England.

What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew: From Fox Hunting to Whist - the Facts of Daily Life in 19th-Century England. I would hesitate to borrow it from the library simply because by the time you took down all the relevant notes, you’d have spent a hellacious amount of time rewritting the book, time you could have spent on your novel! Pool has done an amazing job of addressing so many issues that would provide such authenticity to writers working in this time period.

Author Daniel Pool provides countless intriguing details (did you know that the plums in.4. Since there are occasional, sometimes rather knowing, references to the reigning monarch in some of the novels, it may be helpful to be reminded of the dates of their reigns. George III 1760-1820.

Jane Austen (1775-1817): Sadece kırk iki yıllık, gözden uzak ve sade yaşantısına karşın. The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes us Happier, Healthier an. ki Şehrin Hikâyesi - Charles Dickens. 67 MB·21,031 Downloads·Turkish·New! Dünya edebiyatının en önemli klasik yapıtlarından biri olan İki Şehrin Hikâyesi, Paris ve Londra. Aşk ve Gurur(Can) - Jane Austen The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes us Happier, Healthier and More Creative. 03 MB·84,935 Downloads. The Nature Fix - Florence Williams. Load more similar PDF files.

For anyone who has ever wondered whether a duke outranked an earl, when to yell "Tally Ho!" at a fox hunt, or how one landed in "debtor's prison," this book serves as an indispensable historical and literary resource. Author Daniel Pool provides countless intriguing details (did you know that the "plums" in Christmas plum pudding were actually raisins?) on the Church of England, sex, Parliament, dinner parties, and a host of other aspects of nineteenth-century English life
This book was fascinating! Not only because it gives a really interesting glimpse into how people lived everyday life in the 19th century, but it also can provide an understanding of some of those things one reads in 19th century literature that might leave one scratching their heads - as in, jeez, what's the difference between a "manor", "hall", "abbey", "grange"? What's "Michaelmass"? What's "The Season"? Why does the heroine/hero call some "My Lord" others, "Your Grace" and still others just "Sir"? Believe me, there are reasons and history to these nuances that occurred over time - which also provide a fascinating insight into British cultural evolution.

Another thing that fascinated me - England of the 19th century was a very class centered structured culture; there were lots of rules and very particular ways in how one interacted with their "peers", "betters" or the "lower classes". The author describes the hierarchy of both the "peerage" and "gentry", but also those in "service". The book is complete in that regard, not only does it describe the manner of living & behavior of the upper class, but the middle and lower classes as well. The author does a great job of explaining why standards of behavior differed among the classes - usually for very convenient & monetary purposes, which might seem strange or mercenary to us today, but provide an understanding of the uncertainty and often times limited opportunities of those in 19th century Britain.

The best part of the book is that it reads very easily; it's not overly academic or verbose. And beyond the more everyday curiosities we might have about safety, grocery shopping and education - it also deals with those very human experiences such as death, sex, marriage - how did our English ancestors view these topics, which even today can be so emotional? Some of their views will be recognizable and leaves one nodding...."Ok, that's why...." and other views will seem completely archaic, and even sad.

If you like history, if you enjoy reading the British classics of the 19th century & even if you are a historical romance fan - you'll find it not just fascinating, but illuminating.
I found this book in the library when it first came out, and I was blown away. It explained all the things that the English, especially the Victorian English, took for granted, but modern Americans find incomprehensible. Sooner or later, every English major must come in contact with the Victorians. When they do, this book will be indispensable. If you know such a person, please give them a coy. If you are such a person, buy a copy.
Super useful book that answered many questions I had about this era. Occasionally has a small mistake resulting from trying to generalize the entire 19th century (for instance, it will make a statement about appropriate dress for some social occasion that actually should only apply to, say, the end of the century and not the entire century.)
If you read Regency or Victorian literature this is a reference you will want close at hand. Both Interesting and fun to read, the author says he wanted to "answer some of the questions that nag any half-curious reader of the great nineteenth-century English novels." He does just that. This book is meant as an overview, or introduction, to the period not an in-depth reference. You will not find lengthy discussions of what Jane Austen might have eaten, but there are several sections on foods and dinner parties.

The book includes a large glossary of terms peculiar to the period. I have found it handy when I've come across an unfamiliar word in a novel and didn't want to stop reading and go research it.

While I feel the book does cover both the Regency and Victorian era fairly well, I believe it can be criticized for spanning too great of a period. Imagine a book attempting to give insight into the entire twentieth century, a period that would include the Wright Brothers and the moon landings and corsets and miniskirts, and many more contrasts. The nineteenth century had many similar contrasts making it difficult to write a single volume cover the entire period.

I recommend two other books for anyone reading Victorian literature, Inside the Victorian Home: A Portrait of Domestic Life in Victorian England and To Marry an English Lord by Gail MacColl and Carol McD. Wallace

Recommendation: I recommend this handy reference for anyone who enjoys Regency or Victorian literature.

Kyle Pratt
It is easy to forget, in reading the novels of Jane Austen or Charles Dickens, that their characters inhabited a world almost 200 years removed from our own world of prepackaged food, mechanical aids, and information technology. Daniel Pool's delightful "What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew" is a fascinating attempt to close the knowledge gap about the facts of daily life in 19th Century England.

In a series of short topical essays and an extended glossary of key terms, Pool examines some relevant facts about the 19th Century. He starts with the basics of currency, the calendar, and measurements, then moves on to the public world with its hierarchies, classes, and customs. He discusses transportation, country living, and the private details of everyday living. This book is not exhaustive in its coverage, but it was certainly both enlightening and entertaining to this Jane Austen fan.

"What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew" is very highly recommended to Brit Lit fans, who can enjoy reading it straight through or using it as a reference for t19th Century terms and conditions no longer obvious to 21st Century readers.
This is a non fiction book, so most of the "describes the mood" descriptions required by Amazon aren't relevant.

Its a good book for those interested in the era of Regency (also called Georgian) England......the era of Jane Austen, Waterloo, Napoleon, etc......Charles Dickens was a Victorian, which was the era FOLLOWING the Regency era.....not sure why he is included!