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The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789 (Oxford History of the United States) epub

by Robert Middlekauff


The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789 (Oxford History of the United States) epub

ISBN: 0195162471

ISBN13: 978-0195162479

Author: Robert Middlekauff

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: Oxford University Press; Revised, Expanded edition (February 1, 2005)

Pages: 760 pages

ePUB book: 1104 kb

FB2 book: 1864 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 997

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The Glorious Cause book.

The Glorious Cause book. The first book to appear in the illustrious Oxford History of the United States, this critically acclaimed volume-a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize-offers an unsurpassed history of the Revolutionary War and the birth of the American republic.

The cause was glorious; the book is to. -Dennis Drabelle, Washington Post Book World. -Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times.

The American Revolution 1763–1789.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. The first book to appear in the illustrious Oxford History of the United States, this critically acclaimed volume-a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize-offers an unsurpassed history of the Revolutionary War and th. . Beginning with the French and Indian War and continuing to the election of George Washington as first president, Robert Middlekauff offers a panoramic history of the conflict between England and America, highlighting the drama and anguish of the colonial struggle for independence

The first volume published in the series, Robert Middlekauff's The Glorious Cause: The American .

The first volume published in the series, Robert Middlekauff's The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763–1789, finally was released in 1982. In 1927, Oxford University Press published a two-volume history of the United States by Samuel Eliot Morison, entitled The Oxford History of the United States, 1783–1917. Morison later invited Henry Steele Commager to join him in preparing a revised and expanded version, under the title The Growth of the American Republic.

The first book to appear in the illustrious Oxford History of the United States, this critically acclaimed volume-a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize-offers an unsurpassed history of the Revolutionary War and the birth of the American republic. Beginning with the French and Indian War and continuing to the election of George Washington as first president, Robert Middlekauff offers a panoramic history of the conflict between England and America, highlighting the drama and anguish of the colonial struggle for independence.

The first book to appear in the illustrious Oxford History of the United States, this critically acclaimed volume-a finalist for the . Through it all, Middlekauff gives the reader a vivid sense of how the colonists saw these events and the importance they gave to them.

The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789 (Oxford History of the United States). Download (epub, . 3 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

American Revolution (1775-1783), Confederation of the United States (1783-1789), Amerikaanse .

American Revolution (1775-1783), Confederation of the United States (1783-1789), Amerikaanse Vrijheidsoorlog, War of American Independence. New York : Oxford University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana. Prologue: Sustaining truths - Obstructed giant - Children of the twice-born - Beginnings: from the top down - Stamp Act crisis - Response - Selden's penny - Chance and Charles Townshend - Boston takes the lead - "Bastards of England" - Drift - Resolution - War - "Half.

The first book to appear in the illustrious Oxford History of the United States, this critically acclaimed volume--a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize--offers an unsurpassed history of the Revolutionary War and the birth of the American republic.Beginning with the French and Indian War and continuing to the election of George Washington as first president, Robert Middlekauff offers a panoramic history of the conflict between England and America, highlighting the drama and anguish of the colonial struggle for independence. Combining the political and the personal, he provides a compelling account of the key events that precipitated the war, from the Stamp Act to the Tea Act, tracing the gradual gathering of American resistance that culminated in the Boston Tea Party and "the shot heard 'round the world." The heart of the book features a vivid description of the eight-year-long war, with gripping accounts of battles and campaigns, ranging from Bunker Hill and Washington's crossing of the Delaware to the brilliant victory at Hannah's Cowpens and the final triumph at Yorktown, paying particular attention to what made men fight in these bloody encounters. The book concludes with an insightful look at the making of the Constitution in the Philadelphia Convention of 1787 and the struggle over ratification. Through it all, Middlekauff gives the reader a vivid sense of how the colonists saw these events and the importance they gave to them. Common soldiers and great generals, Sons of Liberty and African slaves, town committee-men and representatives in congress--all receive their due. And there are particularly insightful portraits of such figures as Sam and John Adams, James Otis, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, and many others. This new edition has been revised and expanded, with fresh coverage of topics such as mob reactions to British measures before the War, military medicine, women's role in the Revolution, American Indians, the different kinds of war fought by the Americans and the British, and the ratification of the Constitution. The book also has a new epilogue and an updated bibliography.The cause for which the colonists fought, liberty and independence, was glorious indeed. Here is an equally glorious narrative of an event that changed the world, capturing the profound and passionate struggle to found a free nation.The Oxford History of the United StatesThe Oxford History of the United States is the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. The series includes three Pulitzer Prize winners, a New York Times bestseller, and winners of the Bancroft and Parkman Prizes. The Atlantic Monthly has praised it as "the most distinguished series in American historical scholarship," a series that "synthesizes a generation's worth of historical inquiry and knowledge into one literally state-of-the-art book." Conceived under the general editorship of C. Vann Woodward and Richard Hofstadter, and now under the editorship of David M. Kennedy, this renowned series blends social, political, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military history into coherent and vividly written narrative.
This book takes a rather sharp needle to an era of history that has, probably with good reason, become more legend than actual knowledge. We Americans treasure a certain mythic story line about the Revolution and the people who fought in it. It's been taught to us in school, shown on TV, and referenced by politicians of every stripe.

What this book does, and does it well, is strip those myths away. This isn't to say that this bashes America, Americans, or any particular group, but it does go to great lengths to show that the Revolution came as a surprise to many, even those who normally could be considered in charge of it. Great Britain was not the tyrannical bad guy as often made out to be, but rather a government who failed to heed what was happening. If anything, what surprised me the most about this book was just how NOT inevitable the Revolution was. Hindsight being 20/20 and all that, but many times I was reading and thinking 'If they had just stepped back...' What a difference that would have made to history.

As said, this shows the fledgling country for what it was, disunited, prideful, religious, secular, strong, weak, and with factions that more often than not got in the way of doing what was best for the country instead of helping it, but each convinced that what they were doing WAS the best. Everyone else though... If anything can be taken away from this book, besides a good understanding on just how we got started, it's the lesson that many of the same problems that now beset the United States of America in 2015 that everyone is currently convinced will be the end of us, were more than present in 1776 at the beginning of us. Depending on how you look at it, that could be a good, or a bad, thing.
An excellent account of how the colonies decided to break away from Great Britain and form the United States of America. Middlekauff gives a lot of detail on the beginnings of the Revolution and what was motivating the Americans. While I'd say he has a bit of a bias towards the Americans, he does a great job of explaining the mindsets on both sides of the Atlantic. He explains how the postures taken by both sides eventually led to independence.

I'd say the weakest part of the book for me was simply the battles of the war. They weren't poorly written or anything, just not as interesting as the motivations for independence or what happened after the war was won.

And the final chapters on the creation of the Constitution were very good; I only wish they were even more details here, as it is a fascinating time. The Articles of Confederation are covered, but not in any great detail, but well enough to understand their failures.

All in all, an excellent overview of the time. It certainly helped me understand how the Americans valued liberty and freedom and how that differed from what the British conception of Americans was. I would highly recommend it to any one who wishes to know more about the American Revolutionary era.
The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789 by Robert Middlekauff is a long book, but well worth reading. It’s comprehensive and detailed. It is well documented with footnotes. It also has excellent bibliography section with information for further reading. It’s not a political history or a military history of the war, it incorporates both. It doesn’t just tell you what happened during the American Revolution, it tells you why it happened. A considerable portion of the book, almost 1/3 of it, covers the years preceding the Revolution and explains not only what brought British Colonists to come to the decision to break away from the British Empire, but what caused the British Government to make the decisions that pushed the colonists to the breaking point. Additionally, Middlekauff covers the years immediately after the Revolution, explaining the Constitutional Convention, the deliberations and negotiations within it, and the subsequent ratification process.

This is the best overview of the American Revolution that I’ve read. I don’t see how you could possibly get any more detailed without turning it into a multi-volume work (it’s already part of a multi-volume set – the Oxford History of the United States). The only thing I would have liked to have seen was bit more inclusion of the Spanish involvement in the American Revolution, but other than that it’s hard to find anything negative about this book. For anyone wanting an in-depth look at the why, what, and how of the American Revolution, this is the book. Anyone with an interest in US History should add it to their reading list.
Excellent book and well written overall. Gives comprehensive understanding of the geopolitical reasons that gave rise to the American Revolution, as well as great descriptions of the campaigns fought during the war. Provides deeper understanding of topics you may have learned in grade school. Great fun to read. If you are looking for a one volume, comprehensive study of the American Revolution, this is your book. Only criticism I have is that I wished the author provided a bit more clarity as to what the Stamp Tax actually taxed and why Benedict Arnold changed sides. But, this criticism is mere minutia when taking into consideration the sheer magnitude of this book.
This book covers the period of the French and Indian War and the Revolution plus the writing the Constitution we live with today. In a 700 page book, the author does a very thorough job. He writes about people, battles - economic, political and war- the attitudes of the period he covers, and manages to get a lot of interesting facts and from them his opinions. His opinions are based on the writings of others and his own professional experience and training. They are not obtrusive in any way and many of them echo past historians I have read, some opinions are less popular but nonetheless interesting and possible. This is a book I will keep on my shelves and reread.