» » Travels of William Wells Brown (Early Black Writers)

Travels of William Wells Brown (Early Black Writers) epub

by Paul Jefferson


Travels of William Wells Brown (Early Black Writers) epub

ISBN: 0748603050

ISBN13: 978-0748603053

Author: Paul Jefferson

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: Columbia [email protected] (March 19, 1992)

Pages: 240 pages

ePUB book: 1616 kb

FB2 book: 1210 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 792

Other Formats: mobi doc docx rtf





William Wells Brown, (born 1814?, near Lexington, K. . died Nov. 6, 1884, Chelsea, Mass. American writer who is considered to be the first African-American to publish a novel. He was also the first to have a play and a travel book published.

William Wells Brown, (born 1814?, near Lexington, K. Brown was born to a black slave mother and a white slaveholding father. He grew up near St. Louis, M. where he served various masters, including the abolitionist Elijah P. Lovejoy. Brown escaped in 1834 and adopted the name of a Quaker, Wells Brown, who aided him when he was a runaway

William Wells Brown (c. 1814 – November 6, 1884) was a prominent African-American abolitionist lecturer, novelist, playwright, and historian in the United States.

William Wells Brown (c. Born into slavery in Montgomery County, Kentucky, near the town of Mount Sterling, Brown escaped to Ohio in 1834 at the age of 19. He settled in Boston, Massachusetts, where he worked for abolitionist causes and became a prolific writer.

The Travels of William Wells Brown Paul Jefferson (ed).

Each volume contains an introduction to the writer/subject and full texts annotated with extensive notes. Taken from British African and American sources the texts reflect the growing interest in the origins of contemporary Black literature. The Letters of Ignatius Sancho. The Travels of William Wells Brown Paul Jefferson (ed). Horrors of Slavery Iain McCalman (ed).

William Wells Brown (author), Paul Jefferson (author).

Hobbies & Interests. William Wells Brown (author), Paul Jefferson (author). Hardback 235 Pages, Published: 01/03/1991.

William Wells Brown book

William Wells Brown book. Dramatizing the victimization of black women under slavery, the novel measures the yawning chasm between America’s founding ideals and the brutal realities of bondage. Having traveled to Europe in 1849, Brown elected to remain there after the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, not returning to America until 1854.

William Wells Brown was an African American antislavery lecturer .

William Wells Brown was an African American antislavery lecturer, groundbreaking novelist, playwright and historian. He is widely considered to have been the first African American to publish works in several major literary genres. William Wells Brown settled briefly in Cleveland, Ohio where he married a free African American woman. They had two daughters. Three Years in Europe, published in 1852, was the first travel book ever to be written by an African American while Clotel, which appeared a year later, is one of the earliest novels written by an African American and the first to be published by a British publishing house.

William Wells Brown (November 6, 1816 – November 6, 1884) was a prominent abolitionist lecturer, novelist, playwright, and historian. Born into slavery in the Southern United States, Brown escaped to. Born into slavery in the Southern United States, Brown escaped t.the North, where he worked for abolitionist causes and was a prolific writer. Brown was a pioneer in several different literary genres, including travel writing, fiction, and drama, and wrote what is considered to be the first novel by an African American. An almost exact contemporary of Frederick Douglass, Wells Brown was overshadowed by Douglass and the two feuded publicly.

Abolitionist authors Frederick Douglass and William Wells Brown .

Abolitionist authors Frederick Douglass and William Wells Brown, and spiritualist Harriet E. Wilson were former slaves whose writings transformed their hardships into stunning depictions of racial oppression. Based on a true story, Frederick Douglass' The Heroic Slave is a dramatic fictional retelling of how the determined and courageous Madison Washington led a slave rebellion aboard the ship Creole. In Clotel, the first novel ever written by an African American, William Wells Brown tells a prophetic story about a child conceived by Thomas Jefferson and one of his slaves.

Whether writing about religion, slavery, military service, voting rights, or the colonization of Liberia, these writers merit attention on both artistic and historical grounds. Brawley's historical and literary insights guide readers to a full appreciation of these works

Whether writing about religion, slavery, military service, voting rights, or the colonization of Liberia, these writers merit attention on both artistic and historical grounds. Brawley's historical and literary insights guide readers to a full appreciation of these works. A lamentable gap in knowledge of the black experience is filled by this anthology; it should be read by all students of history and literature.

This is the story of two trips by a fugitive slave. One of the dramatic and poignant journey of a humiliated slave up the Mississippi to the North, into freedom. The second is a glorious voyage to Europe of the same man, now an elegant and eloquent ambassador of the abolitionists, who hobnobs with writers like Victor Hugo and moves freely in high society. His autobiography, "Narrative of William Wells Brown, A Fugitive Slave" (1845), chronicles Brown's life in bondage-disclosing aspects of slavery more various and distrubing than even the narrative of his contemporary Frederick Douglas and his pilgrim's progress north to freedom. This book is one of the most significant works of slave literature. Ten years later Brown published "The American Fugitive in Europe - Sketches of Places and People Abroad", a travel report written in the style of the best European journalism. Both are included in this volume. Both the autobiography and the travel account are classic examples of 19th century first-person prose narratives.