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Budapest and New York: Studies in Metropolitan Transformation, 1870-1930 epub

by Thomas Bender,Carle E. Schorske


Budapest and New York: Studies in Metropolitan Transformation, 1870-1930 epub

ISBN: 0871541130

ISBN13: 978-0871541130

Author: Thomas Bender,Carle E. Schorske

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation (January 13, 1994)

Pages: 414 pages

ePUB book: 1790 kb

FB2 book: 1451 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 557

Other Formats: mobi lit doc lrf





Little over a century ago, New York and Budapest were both flourishing cities engaging in spectacular modernization. THOMAS BENDER is University Professor of the Humanities and professor of history at New York University.

Little over a century ago, New York and Budapest were both flourishing cities engaging in spectacular modernization. CARL E. SCHORSKE is professor emeritus at Princeton University, and the Pulitzer Prize winning author of Fin-de-Siecle Vienna: Politics and Culture.

Bender, Thomas; Schorske, Carl E. (1994). Budapest and New York: Studies in Metropolitan Transformation, 1870-1930. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation. Bender, Thomas (1992). Intellect and Public Life: Essays on the Social History of Academic Intellectuals in the United States. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.

In 1870 new york and budapest were peripheral cities, one on the western . SCHORSKE and THOMAS BENDER.

In 1870 new york and budapest were peripheral cities, one on the western perimeter of the European core, the other on the eastern. Yet both harbored metropolitan ambitions. In the book,Five Spirits, Béla Hamvas writes with remarkable lucidity about the spirit of a location that captivates people, about that strange impression certain places make on the observer. place has metaphysical, as well as physical presence and, as such, is both a spirit and a spectacle. The comparisons of New York and Budapest yielded by this study are far from comprehensive.

Born in The Bronx, New York City, to Theodore Schorske and Gertrude .

Born in The Bronx, New York City, to Theodore Schorske and Gertrude Goldsmith, Schorske received his . from Columbia in 1936 and a P. His first book, German Social Democracy, published by Harvard University Press in 1955, describes the schism of the Social Democratic Party of Germany into a onalist Right faction and a revolutionary oppositionist Left faction during the years 1905–17. Budapest and New York : studies in metropolitan transformation, 1870-1930, with Thomas Bender (1994, Russell Sage Foundation).

Budapest and New York book. A more consciously ive study could have been a useful contribution to urban studies in general, and would have been interesting to a much broader audience.

Journal of American Studies. Journal of American Studies. Thomas Bender and Carl E. Schorske (ed., Budapest and New York: Studies in Metropolitan Transformation, 1870–1930 (New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1994). Pp. 400. ISBN 0 87154 113 0.

New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1994. Bender, Thomas, and Carl E. Schorske, eds. Budapest and New York: Studies in Metropolitan Transformation: 1870–1930. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1994. xiv, 400. Hans P. Werner.

Budapest and New York: Studies in Metropolitan Transformation, 1870-1930. By 1930, New York had emerged as an innovating cosmopolitan metropolis, while Budapest languished under the conditions that would foster fascism

Budapest and New York: Studies in Metropolitan Transformation, 1870-1930. Additional Information. Thomas Bender, Carle E. Schorske. Published by: Russell Sage Foundation. By 1930, New York had emerged as an innovating cosmopolitan metropolis, while Budapest languished under the conditions that would foster fascism. Budapest and New York explores the increasingly divergent trajectories of these once-similar cities through the perspectives of both Hungarian and American experts in the fields of political, cultural, social and art history.

by Thomas Bender and Carl E. Russell Sage Foundation. Read Time: Summer 1994. Download PDF. More From This Issue.

Scholarly innovators of different generations offer insiders' views of the course of change in their own fields, revealing the internal dynamics of disciplinary change. Historians examine the external context for these changes-including the Cold War, Vietnam, feminism, civil rights, and multiculturalism.

Little over a century ago, New York and Budapest were both flourishing cities engaging in spectacular modernization. By 1930, New York had emerged as an innovating cosmopolitan metropolis, while Budapest languished under the conditions that would foster fascism. Budapest and New York explores the increasingly divergent trajectories of these once-similar cities through the perspectives of both Hungarian and American experts in the fields of political, cultural, social and art history. Their original essays illuminate key aspects of urban life that most reveal the turn-of-the-century evolution of New York and Budapest: democratic participation, use of public space, neighborhood ethnicity, and culture high and low. What comes across most strikingly in these essays is New York's cultivation of social and political pluralism, a trend not found in Budapest. Nationalist ideology exerted tremendous pressure on Budapest's ethnic groups to assimilate to a single Hungarian language and culture. In contrast, New York's ethnic diversity was transmitted through a mass culture that celebrated ethnicity while muting distinct ethnic traditions, making them accessible to a national audience. While Budapest succumbed to the patriotic imperatives of a nation threatened by war, revolution, and fascism, New York, free from such pressures, embraced the variety of its people and transformed its urban ethos into a paradigm for America. Budapest and New York is the lively story of the making of metropolitan culture in Europe and America, and of the influential relationship between city and nation. In unifying essays, the editors observe comparisons not only between the cities, but in the scholarly outlooks and methodologies of Hungarian and American histories. This volume is a unique urban history. Begun under the unfavorable conditions of a divided world, it represents a breakthrough in cross-cultural, transnational, and interdisciplinary historical work.