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Jan Ken Po: The World of Hawaii's Japanese Americans epub

by Dennis M. Ogawa


Jan Ken Po: The World of Hawaii's Japanese Americans epub

ISBN: 0824803981

ISBN13: 978-0824803988

Author: Dennis M. Ogawa

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press; 2nd edition (December 1, 1982)

Pages: 196 pages

ePUB book: 1961 kb

FB2 book: 1520 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 462

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Regardless, Dr. Ogawa’s book on Hawaii’s Japanese Americans is enlightening

Regardless, Dr. Ogawa’s book on Hawaii’s Japanese Americans is enlightening. I would read this in conjunction with two recent books about Hawaii; Captive Paradise, about the colonization of the islands, and Charlie Chan & Chang Apana, about Hawaiian history told through the stories of two popular characters.

Quin Hajime Ogawa Owen Takematsu Ogawa Autumn Ruriko Ogawa. Published in Japanese, Eihosha, Ltd. 1978 (two chapters). Transcribed into Braille and Cassette for State of Hawaii, Department of Education.

An excellent introduction to the Japanese American. Senator Daniel K. Inouye "Every ethnic group here should have a book written about it as sensitive as the one by Dennis Ogawa on Hawaii's Japanese

An excellent introduction to the Japanese American. Inouye "Every ethnic group here should have a book written about it as sensitive as the one by Dennis Ogawa on Hawaii's Japanese.

It was having the chance to meet this author, Professor Dennis M. Ogawa, last month at the Japanese American National Museum in downtown Los Angeles, to hear him ‘talk stories’ about his latest book, ‘California Hotel and Casino: Hawaii’s Home Away from Home,’ that led me to this, his earlier book, ‘Jan Ken Po: The World of Hawaii’s Japanese. I’m very glad it did.

Jan Ken Po, Ai Kono Sho Junk An'a Po, I Canna Show These words to a simple child's game brought from Japan and made local, the property of all of Hawaii's people, symbolize the cultural transformation experienced by Hawaii's Japanese. It is the story of this experience that Dennis Ogawa tells so well here. See all 2 brand new listings.

University of Hawaii Press. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 0 x . 0 Inches.

Book Description: "Jan Ken Po, Ai Kono Sho" "Junk An'a Po, I Canna .

Book Description: "Jan Ken Po, Ai Kono Sho" "Junk An'a Po, I Canna Show". These words to a simple child's game brought from Japan and made local, the property of all of Hawaii's people, symbolize the cultural transformation experienced by Hawaii's Japanese. eISBN: 978-0-8248-4577-3. The cultural identity of Hawaii’s Japanese Americans is a product of many factors, some subtle and some obvious. As we have seen, within the framework of parents, siblings and relatives, Japanese Americans learn a system of values essential to their primary referent group, the family.

The World of Hawaii's Japanese Americans. Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. Published by University of Hawaii Press. Need help ASAP? We have you covered with 24/7 instant online tutoring. Connect with one of our an-Studies tutors now. ABOUT CHEGG.

Ogawa, Dennis M. (1978). p. 4. an ken po: the World of Hawaii's Japanese Americans,, p. 48, at Google Books. Johnson, George Toshio. Into the Next Stage: Japanese American Newspapers: Over and Out?" Rafu Shimpo (US). February 17, 2011; retrieved 2011-05-17. Japanese American National Museum (JANM), "What is Nikkei?" retrieved 2011-05-17.

Jan Ken Po, Ai Kono Sho Junk An'a Po, I Canna Show

Jan Ken Po, Ai Kono Sho Junk An'a Po, I Canna Show. Dennis M. Ogawa received his PhD from UCLA in 1969 where he was honored as one of the founders of the UCLA Asian American Studies Center

"Jan Ken Po, Ai Kono Sho""Junk An'a Po, I Canna Show"

These words to a simple child's game brought from Japan and made local, the property of all of Hawaii's people, symbolize the cultural transformation experienced by Hawaii's Japanese. It is the story of this experience that Dennis Ogawa tells so well here.

This was recommended reading when I was in college in 1974 in an American History class. Since I have am born & raised from Hawaii this was a good read. I don't usually read a book twice but this is a good one.
This book was written 1973. It is a generalized history of the early Japanese immigrants and Nisei living in Hawaii. In one chapter, the author states if the Japanese Americans in Hawaii buy or treat someone with gifts/dinners, then the Japanese American in Hawaii also has an ulterior motive to obligate the recipient in the future. The author's research were taken from interviews, which may have pertained to the actions of only one family, while these motives are not true for most of the Japanese Americans in Hawaii. The author is misleading and portrays the Japanese Americans in Hawaii as generally devious and cunning for self gain. I know books have to sell; but why mislead the general public to be wary of the Japanese Americans in Hawaii for the actions of a few. Some of us are not devious nor cunning. Some of us do things because we want to.
since I married a person from Hawaii, not expecting there would be such a difference in background from a Nisei raised in North Dakota, there was much helpful information in this book
I bought this for low price so I thought it might be good but
the quality of this book was not really good.
Japanese Hawaiians are strangers everywhere, says the author; in Japan they’re typical American tourists with foreign airs and big appetites; in continental USA, they’re bumpkins with funny grammar. It was during World War II that the Hawaiian and Californian Nisei encountered each other in the 44th Combat Team, and the two sides got into fights. The Hawaiians thought the mainland Nisei, or “Katonks,” were snobs with fancy accents like the Haolis (Caucasians) back home. The mainland Nisei couldn’t understand (then or now) why Hawaiians like to eat Spam and canned Vienna sausages. In California, then as now, canned meat is not a delicacy, but synonymous with poverty.
Mainland versus Continental conflict aside, Dr. Dennis Ogawa devotes a chapter, and a humorous one at that, to the intergenerational conflict. On one hand you have the reputation-obsessed parents, while on the other, you have the American-raised kids. Everything is about honor or shame to the older generation, while the kids born after 1950 have an “anything goes” attitude. The Sesei (third generation) daughter who dates a long-haired boy that her parents don’t like, or the college educated daughter who moves out before she gets married, these things will shame the parents. Dr. Ogawa attributes the low crime and divorce rates among Japanese Hawaiians to this. If you get divorced, the neighbors will think you can’t handle life.
Geography also comes into play in this book, since Hawaii is a group of islands, and you can’t move away easily to escape shame. Close proximity means everyone has to get along. Though the author doesn’t mention it, parts of Hawaii are separated by mountains, so the towns may be isolated from each other unless you travel by water. I don’t know if rail travel came to any of the islands, and there were no little puddle-jumping planes until the 1930’s. The Japanese, Filipino, Chinese, Korean, Spanish, Portuguese,
Occasionally, I find a forgotten book, and sometimes, the story isn’t outdated. Jan Ken Po is 40 years old, and it’s the kind of book that probably wasn’t read much when it came out. The author is (or more likely was) a professor of American studies at the University of Hawaii, and according to his writing, he probably wasn’t well known off-island. He drops hints here and there that Hawaii’s college graduates usually stay in the islands, so I doubt his work reached far and wide. Regardless, Dr. Ogawa’s book on Hawaii’s Japanese Americans is enlightening. I would read this in conjunction with two recent books about Hawaii; Captive Paradise, about the colonization of the islands, and Charlie Chan & Chang Apana, about Hawaiian history told through the stories of two popular characters.
My only suggestion to the author would be an update, because Hawaiian life has definitely changed since the book was written. The media image of Hawaii is different now too, and there have been a few decent movies (like The Picture Bride) that portray the state’s history. Unfortunately, too many of us only know Hawaii from the Dog The Bounty Hunter tv series, and the image isn’t good. I’d also like to know if there’s any class conflict between the Japanese Hawaiians and the natives, Tongans, and Samoans who now live on the islands.