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Creoles Of Color: Gulf South epub

by James H. Dormon


Creoles Of Color: Gulf South epub

ISBN: 0870499173

ISBN13: 978-0870499173

Author: James H. Dormon

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: Univ Tennessee Press; 1 edition (April 1, 1996)

Pages: 208 pages

ePUB book: 1161 kb

FB2 book: 1208 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 798

Other Formats: docx lit doc mbr





Start by marking Creoles Of Color Of The Gulf South as Want to Read .

Start by marking Creoles Of Color Of The Gulf South as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Although the book begins with an analysis of the Creole population's origins in the New Orleans area, the subsequent essays focus on the Creole communities outside that city.

Dormon, James H. "Louisiana's 'Creoles of Color': Ethnicity, Marginality, and Identity," Social Science Quarterly 73, No. 3, 1992: 615-623.

Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1996. Dormon, James H. New York: Macmillan, 1975.

Creoles of color of the Gulf South.

Theater in the Ante Bellum South 1815-1861. The Afro-American experience. The Afro-American experience: a cultural history through emancipation. Creoles of color of the Gulf South.

The Creoles of color are a historic ethnic group of Creole people that developed in the former French and Spanish colonies of Louisiana (especially in the city of New Orleans), Southern Mississippi, Alabama.

The Creoles of color are a historic ethnic group of Creole people that developed in the former French and Spanish colonies of Louisiana (especially in the city of New Orleans), Southern Mississippi, Alabama, and Northwestern Florida in what is now the United States. French colonists in Louisiana first used the term "Creole" to refer to whites born in the colony, rather than in France. It was also used for slaves born in the colony.

Chicago Distribution Center. James H. Dormon, ed.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of James H Dormon books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. People Called Cajuns.

In James Dormon (e., Creoles of color of the Gulf South. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press. Ethnicity and identity: Creoles of color in twentieth century South Louisiana. Brasseaux, Carl, Fontenot, Keith, & Oubre, Claude. Creoles of color in the Bayou Country. Jackson: University of Mississippi Press. In James Dormon (e. A comparison of stressed vowels of Black and White speakers in the South.

With its multidimensional, cross-disciplinary emphasis, Creoles of Color of the Gulf South constitutes an especially notable contribution to the current scholarly interest in ethnic minorities and racial dynamics in American history and culture. Geographic Name: Louisiana Social life and customs.

Dormon, James . ed. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1996. Hall, Gwendolyn Midlo. Africans in Colonial Louisiana: The Development of Afro-Creole Culture in the Eighteenth Century. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1995. Kein, Sybil, ed. Creole: The History and Legacy of Louisiana’s Free People of Color.

The Kingdom of Zydeco. New York: Avon Books, 1998.

Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press, 1996. --. Zydeco and Mardi Gras: Creole Identity and Performance Genres in Rural French Louisiana. The Kingdom of Zydeco.

Consisting of eight original essays by noted scholars, this volume examines the history and culture of a unique population - those peoples in the Gulf region who descended from the colonial and antebellum free persons of color and who represent the middle ground in the region's "tri-racial" social order.Although the book begins with an analysis of the Creole population's origins in the New Orleans area, the subsequent essays focus on the Creole communities outside that city. Throughout the volume the contributors demonstrate the persistence of the Creole ethnic identity. Included are examinations of Creole populations in the cities of Pensacola and Mobile, as well as those in the bayou and prairie regions of Louisiana. In addition to dealing with sociohistorical aspects of the Creole experience, the book features essays that examine language, music, and folklore. The concluding essay, which cuts across several disciplines, covers the late twentieth-century revitalization of the Gulf Creole communities.With its multidimensional, cross-disciplinary emphasis, Creoles of Color of the Gulf South constitutes an especially notable contribution to the current scholarly interest in ethnic minorities and racial dynamics in American history and culture.