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Momofuku epub

by David Chang


Momofuku epub

ISBN: 030745195X

ISBN13: 978-0307451958

Author: David Chang

Category: Food and Wine

Subcategory: Regional & International

Language: English

Publisher: Clarkson Potter (October 27, 2009)

Pages: 304 pages

ePUB book: 1477 kb

FB2 book: 1585 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 702

Other Formats: mbr txt lrf docx





This item:Momofuku: A Cookbook by David Chang Hardcover CDN$ 4. 9. David Chang is magical–that’s why it’s so difficult to explain what he does. I can only tell you that you need to experience his cooking; it will move you deeply

This item:Momofuku: A Cookbook by David Chang Hardcover CDN$ 4. I can only tell you that you need to experience his cooking; it will move you deeply. He is a chef of prodigious talent–and also a great guy.

David Chang, Peter Meehan. Never before has there been a phenomenon like Momofuku. A once-unrecognizable word, it's now synonymous with the award-winning restaurants of the same name in New York City (Momofuku Noodle Bar, Ssäm Bar, Ko, Má Pêche, Fuku, Nishi, and Milk Bar), Toronto, and Sydney.

Never before has there been a phenomenon like Momofuku. Chef David Chang has single-handedly revolutionized cooking in America with his use of bold Asian flavors and impeccable ingredients, his mastery of the Never before has there been a phenomenon like Momofuku. A once-unrecognizable word, it's now synonymous with the award-winning restaurants of the same name in New York City: Momofuku Noodle Bar, Ssäm Bar, Ko, and Milk Bar.

David Chang's first cookbook is long, complicated and laced with profanity. In food circles, it's one of the most highly anticipated books of the year. Momofuku Chef Releases First Cookbook. Mr. Chang, 32 years old, has emerged as one of the country's hottest chefs since launching Momofuku Noodle Bar, then a 27-seat restaurant in downtown Manhattan, in 2004. Chef David Chang's first cookbook is long, wordy and laced with profanity about the restaurant business - and his publisher expects it to be a hit.

Chef David Chang single-handedly revolutionized cooking in America and beyond with his use of bold Asian flavors .

Chef David Chang single-handedly revolutionized cooking in America and beyond with his use of bold Asian flavors and impeccable ingredients, his mastery of the humble ramen noodle, and his thorough devotion to pork. Chang relays with candor the tale of his unwitting rise to superstardom, which, though wracked with mishaps, happened at light speed. This is a must-read for anyone who truly enjoys food.

David Chang (Korean: Chang Seok-ho 장석호; born August 5, 1977) is an American restaurateur, author, and television personality

David Chang (Korean: Chang Seok-ho 장석호; born August 5, 1977) is an American restaurateur, author, and television personality.

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With 200,000+ copies in print, this New York Times bestseller shares the story and the recipes behind the chef and cuisine that changed the modern-day culinary landscape. Never before has there been a phenomenon like Momofuku. A once-unrecognizable word, it's now synonymous with the award-winning restaurants of the same name in New York City (Momofuku Noodle Bar, Ssäm Bar, Ko, Má Pêche, Fuku, Nishi, and Milk Bar), Toronto, and Sydney. Chef David Chang single-handedly revolutionized cooking in America and beyond with his use of bold Asian flavors and impeccable ingredients, his mastery of the humble ramen noodle, and his thorough devotion to pork.  Chang relays with candor the tale of his unwitting rise to superstardom, which, though wracked with mishaps, happened at light speed. And the dishes shared in this book are coveted by all who've dined—or yearned to—at any Momofuku location (yes, the pork buns are here). This is a must-read for anyone who truly enjoys food.

I bought Momofuku a few weeks ago, after I heard an interview with the author on NPR. Coincidentally, my eleven year old daughter and I are going through a Ramen Noodles craze, inspired by Hayao Miyazaki's films (the grandfather in Whisper of the Heart serves noodles to the young ones when in distress; and in Ponyo the mom makes noodles look like magic).

In any case, I wanted something better than the packages available at the local Asian grocery store. Now, a month later, not only are my ramen noodles exquisite, but Momofuku has made me a much better cook. Here's why:
* Chang's attention to the quality of the ingredients one uses: I found a local farmer who raises pigs and drove an hour and a half on beautiful Oklahoma country roads to her place. My freezer is now packed with wonderful cuts of free ranging, non-chemical raised pork, stew meat, and bacon.
* His large quantities did not deter me. Actually, the book's advise on how to store food is perfect for my family of two. I made a huge pot of ramen noodle broth, let it reduce and once ready (simmered for 6 hours), stored in small containers in the freezer. Now I have absolutely wonderful broth for months. (Note: as a Colombian from the Andes, I don't want my broth to have any fishy flavor, so I excluded the Kombu from Chang's recipe)
* Chang's recipe for roasting pork is amazing too! I followed it by the book and ended up with something so good I had a hard time believing I had made it. I roasted a huge chunk of shoulder, and once ready and cool, shredded it, divided it in small zip lock bags, and to the freezer. As with the broth, I have excellent roasted pork to add to our weekly ramen noodles.
* Chang's creative techniques: I will never fry chicken any other way. Momofuku's recipe for fried chicken is exquisite. Easy, creative, and the chicken is delicious, tender, not oily, brown on the outside ...perfect.
* Small details that take once's eating experience to an entirely new level: such as the ginger, scallion recipe. Again, as a Colombian, when nostalgic sometimes I add a little chopped cilantro to the ginger-scallion sauce.

Chang's approach to Asian cuisine, his respect for tradition without the anxiety of hybridizing, bending, mixing, is perfect for a Colombian bored with the food available in central Oklahoma and trying to make good food out of an ordinary, everyday life kitchen.
As a food enthusiast and wannabe cook I enjoyed this book. I give it 5 stars because it exceeded what I wanted out of the book. I was looking for Chang's story and it delivers. He goes into pretty good detail to tell his personal journey from novice to superstar chef as he toiled to open up his restaurants.

The recipes range in difficulty but all are doable. As a whole, they can be done at home but require special equipment, like a sous vide but Chang offers plenty of alternatives if you don't have said equipment. The Ginger-Scallion sauce, delicious. As well as the strawberry shortcake. It's salty but the salt is needed to balance out the sweetness of the strawberries. I never got a chance to make the deep fried apple pie, but some day I will.

If you are curious about how some chefs created their brand and how they cook, this is definitely a book to check out. He drops a lot of gems and helpful recommendations.
I know. I'm late to the party, but this cookbook is my fav. Everything I've made is amazing.
I've made a few of the recipes form this book; pork buns, scallions and ginger sauce, and tare sauce for chicken wings. I've had various degrees of success.

This book is great for the story that Chang tells. Its not just a recipe book but describes his insecurities of starting a restaurant as well as journey to building an empire.

I thought the recipes were written very well. There are some things that are a little bit difficult to understand. I still don't understand his process of cold smoking indoors. But generally the recipes are written very well and usually helps you understand why a particular process or ingredient is used. Not always. I'm still not sure why he decided to use usukuchi over regular soy sauce. I'm guessing its due to the saltiness of the soy sauce and/or the color. I'm sure there is another characteristic that he likes as well.

Some of the recipes are deceptively simple! His pork belly recipe literally have only 3 ingredients: pork belly, sugar and salt. The result is mind glowingly good. This book will make you feel and look like a genius!

I haven't made a batch of ramen from this book… yet! But it can be something that will take a home cook a full day or a few days to make.

Some of the ingredients can be a little hard to find. I had a hard time finding the soy sauce he uses (usukuchi). I've found it at one of the Korean grocery stores, but the ingredient was expired. I'm not sure if that matters very much with soy sauce, but I didn't buy it. I don't like expired ingredients. I used the soy sauce that I usually use. I'm not sure what effect that had on the dish. However, the tare turned out very good. The scallions and ginger sauce was very pungent. But the recipe calls for outrageous amounts of ginger and scallions. I'm not sure what effect my substitute ingredients had on the recipe, but I would like to try and find out.

This book is great if you are wanting experience some of Momofuku without going to NYC.
Wife bought this as a gift to me so I can make her ramen. Have made ramen quite a few times. The noodle recipe is slightly hard to follow because I only had kansui instead of the powder form that David uses. Not sure if it makes that big of a difference but after trial and error I've been able to make some decent fresh noodles. The kimchi and pickling recipes are all great. Have yet to try a lot of the other recipes but enjoyed the read.
This cookbook was well written in regard to the cultural history and technical aspects of this author's methods. I am familiar with David Chang and his groundbreaking impact on the culinary world. Having said that, I feel that there is more history than cookbook and recipes. While I appreciate the recipes and techniques, I live in a small town and the ingredients needed are not always available to me. It's a beautiful book and a great history of David Chang's culture.