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Beyond Slash, Burn, and Poison: Transforming Breast Cancer Stories into Action epub

by Marcy Knopf-Newman


Beyond Slash, Burn, and Poison: Transforming Breast Cancer Stories into Action epub

ISBN: 0813534704

ISBN13: 978-0813534701

Author: Marcy Knopf-Newman

Category: Fitness and Dieting

Subcategory: Diseases & Physical Ailments

Language: English

Publisher: Rutgers University Press; 1 edition (September 29, 2004)

Pages: 224 pages

ePUB book: 1310 kb

FB2 book: 1778 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 669

Other Formats: mobi docx doc lit





Knopf-Newman also shows us how these writings eventually changed public opinion and the underlying .

Knopf-Newman also shows us how these writings eventually changed public opinion and the underlying tendency to blame women for their illness. Rather than facilitating forums for separate discussions, this book brings conversations into dialog with each other.

Knopf-Newman also shows us how these writings eventually changed public opinion and the underlying .

Includes bibliographical references (p. 175-186) and index. Miss Carson goes to Washington: Rachel Carson's public silence - Media medical interventions: Betty Ford's public(ity) pedagogy - Rose Kushner versus the medical establishment: defending a woman's right to choose - Toward truth and reconciliation: Audre Lorde's revision of breast cancer narratives - Conclusion: taking action.

Marcy Jane Knopf-Newman. Rutgers university press, 2004. Most of us who've been given-or have a mother, sister or friend who's been given-a diagnosis of breast cancer, will recognize the "slash, burn and poison" in the title of Marcy Jane Knopf-Newman's book. It refers to what are still the standard treatments for the disease: surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Knopf-Newman uses the stories of Lorde and three other fairly well-known 20th-century American women to explore not only how breast cancer affected them, but how their experiences with breast cancer changed things for the rest of us. The facts and framework of this book powerfully demonstrate the ability of women's words to transform society, and point the way to a future in which breast cancer policy reflects the experiences of all women?and men?affected by the disease. Barbara Brenner, executive director of Breast Cancer Action "Beyond Slash, Burn, and Poison frames a number. Depending on one's vantage point, breast cancer can be a very different experience, and indeed, a very different concern. It is, for some, a personal struggle; for others, it is a disease posing scientific and environmental challenges; and for others it is a highly charged and politicized issue around which policy wars rage. Beyond Slash, Burn, and Poison brings a unique perspective to breast cancer by recognizing the overlapping relationship of all these realities.

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Burn, and Poison : Transforming Breast Cancer Stories into Action. Book Overview Slash, Burn, and Poison brings a unique perspective to breast cancer b. .

Beyond Slash, Burn, and Poison : Transforming Breast Cancer Stories into Action. by Marcy Jane Knopf-Newman.

Breast cancer is, for some, a personal struggle; for others, it is a disease posing scientific and environmental challenges; and for others it is a highly charged and politicized issue around which policy wars rage. This book recognises the overlapping relationship of all these realities. Breast - Cancer - Social aspects - United States. Cancer patients' writings, American. Breast - Cancer - Social aspects.

Depending on one’s vantage point, breast cancer can be a very different experience, and indeed, a very different concern.  It is, for some, a personal struggle; for others, it is a disease posing scientific and environmental challenges; and for others it is a highly charged and politicized issue around which policy wars rage. Beyond Slash, Burn, and Poison brings a unique perspective to breast cancer by recognizing the overlapping relationship of all these realities.

Drawing on the writings of Rachel Carson, Betty Ford, Rose Kushner, and Audre Lorde, this book explores the various ways in which patient-centered texts continue to leave their mark on the political realm of breast cancer and, ultimately, the disease itself. Ordered chronologically, the selections trace the progression of discussions about breast cancer from a time when the subject was kept private and silent to when it became part of public discourse. The texts included are personal accounts, written by women struggling to play an active role in their healing process and, at the same time, hoping to help others do the same. 

Knopf-Newman also shows us how these writings eventually changed public opinion and the underlying tendency to blame women for their illness. She argues that changes in medical practice and public policy are linked to textual interventions, and makes a case for the politicization of cultural studies of disease through personal and literary expression.Passionately written and well-researched, Beyond Slash, Burn, and Poison transforms how we think about breast cancer.  Rather than facilitating forums for separate discussions, this book brings conversations into dialog with each other. It is essential reading for anyone concerned with breast cancer and its history, as well as for those interested in the effect of the environment on public health and the role that literature plays in public policy and medicine. 

Beyond, Slash, Burn, and Poison explains much about breast cancer and the history of its treatment as it chronicles women's long struggles for the right to have a voice in the treatment of breast cancer. Author Marcy Knopf-Newman focuses on the experiences of five women -- 19th century novelist Frances Burney, Rachel Carson, Betty Ford, Rose Kushner, and Audre Lorde -- each of whose conduct comprised a major step in empowering women with breast cancer. The book shows that struggling to make our voices heard can change the consciousness not only of victims of oppression, but of the dominant culture as well. Over the years, work for social change does succeed!

In the early days of breast cancer treatment, women experienced a terrifying conflict, here best illustrated in the experiences of Carson and Kushner. Though fully aware that the power over their health lay with the establishment that valued deference, discretion, and being nice, they honored their deep inner need to investigate treatment options, speak out, challenge the medical establishment, and be honest and open about the disease.

Thanks mostly to the work of people like these, medicine began to evolve in the early seventies so that information has become increasingly available to patients, multiple options for the treatment of breast cancer have been developed, and patients' needs are increasingly attended to. The book is not just a history; reading it makes one feel committed to becoming informed and assertive in exploring medical treatment options
Marcy Knopf-Newman's new book on breast cancer stories is an important intervention in this oft avoided topic. From Rachel Carson's "public silence," to Audre Lorde's very public examination of her own breast cancer, Ms. Knopf-Newman writes a history of mid- to late-twentieth century approaches to the act of telling stories about breast cancer. What makes Ms. Knopf-Newman's book so important, however, is the arc or plot of its telling: from enforced silence and acquiescence to the prevailing dogmas of medical science at mid-century, and the near complete and unquestioned predominance of the Halsted radical mastectomy, to the emergence of a critical questioning of medical practices and procedures as revolutionary medical practitioners, feminists, and even public figures begin to enable ordinary people to see breast cancer in new ways and seek new forms of treatment. Ms. Knopf-Newman is espeically good on Betty Ford and the public impact of her cancer and treatment, as well as on the history of Rose Kushner, a local Maryland activist who brushed history against the grain with her insistance on the short-comings of the Halsted procedure even before the US Congress. This is a well research, well reasoned, and well told story - one that is not told often enough, certainly. And it's refreshing, as well, because it's told in a compelling and straightforward language, one that does not rely on any overly wrought theoretical language. And finally, it's amazing, too, just for its sense of awe and admiration for the figures it treats - Carson, Ford, Kushner, Lorde. This is a book of heroes, not victims, and deserve a wide audience.