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An Education: The Screenplay epub

by Nick Hornby


An Education: The Screenplay epub

ISBN: 0141044748

ISBN13: 978-0141044743

Author: Nick Hornby

Category: Entertainment

Subcategory: Movies

Language: English

Publisher: Viking (May 1, 2010)

Pages: 224 pages

ePUB book: 1856 kb

FB2 book: 1900 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 710

Other Formats: lit txt mobi rtf





AN EDUCATION: - The Screenplay. Appendix: alternative ending. An education: the screenplay.

AN EDUCATION: - The Screenplay. Nick Hornby is the author of the bestselling novels Juliet, Naked, Slam, A Long Way Down, How to Be Good, High Fidelity, and About a Boy, and the memoir Fever Pitch. No part of this book may be reproduced, scanned, or distributed in any printed or electronic form without permission.

An Education: A Screenplay is Nick Hornby’s script for the film adaptation of Lynn Barber’s An Education starring Carey Mulligan, as teenager Jenny . I adapted Fever Pitch for the screen myself, and the fi lm was eventually made

An Education: A Screenplay is Nick Hornby’s script for the film adaptation of Lynn Barber’s An Education starring Carey Mulligan, as teenager Jenny, and Peter Sarsgraad, as the older man David she accepts a lift home from. I adapted Fever Pitch for the screen myself, and the fi lm was eventually made. But since then there have been at least three other projects – a couple of originals, and an adaptation of somebody else’s work – which ended in failure, or at least in no end product, which is the same thing.

Hornby's charming script is included in An Education: The Screenplay, along with stills from the film and a long introduction in which he wittily describes the process of converting someone's very personal memoir into a hit film.

About the AuthorNick Hornby is the author of the bestselling novels Slam,A Long Way Down, How to Be Good, High Fidelity, and About a Boy, and the memoir Fever Pitch. Отзывы - Написать отзыв. Пользовательский отзыв - howifeelaboutbooks - ww. ibrarything. A screenplay based on a memoir essay by Lynn Barber, adapted by Nick Hornby. I haven't seen the movie, but I'm kind of curious to, now. It's about a sixteen-year-old girl in England in 1962.

An Education is a 2009 coming-of-age drama film based on a memoir of the same name by British journalist Lynn Barber. The film was directed by Lone Scherfig from a screenplay by Nick Hornby.

In this now-classic book, he vividly depicts his troubled relationship with his father,, his time as a teacher, and his first loves (after football), all through the prism of the game, as he insightfully and brilliantly explores obsession, and the way it can shape a life.

An Education: Screenplay. An Education: Screenplay. Download (mobi, 700 Kb). EPUB FB2 PDF TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Writer Nick Hornby is gearing up for a busy fall. Hornby says his inspiration for the book came from an article he read about Sly Stone, the reclusive lead singer of Sly and the Family Stone. He wrote the screenplay for the much anticipated film An Education, which will be released next month, and his newest novel, Juliet, Naked, hits bookstores this week. Juliet, Naked, like Hornby's first novel, High Fidelity, explores the complex world of music fanaticism.

The script for major new film An Education, the story of the bizarre relationship between 1960s teenager Jenny (played by Carey Mulligan) and older man David (Peter Sarsgaard), after she accepts a lift on her way home from music practice one day. Based on Observer journalist Lynn Barber's real-life experience as recounted in her book An Education, the film won the Audience Award for best film at the Sundance Film Festival and tremendous acclaim at the Berlin Film Festival too. It will be released in the UK in October 2009 and promises to be the season's Slumdog Millionaire. Hornby's charming script is included in An Education: The Screenplay, along with stills from the film and a long introduction in which he wittily describes the process of converting someone's very personal memoir into a hit film.
The Introduction and Sundance Diary gives an excellent example of what it takes to write a screenplay, get a movie made and anticipate it's premier. And the film itself is an good example of an age-discrepant relationship. I highly recommend that you at least read the Introduction and Sundance Diary if you desire to write and sell a screenplay.

Katie
NOT THE BEST OF HORNBY
Do not be confused like I was: the book by Nick Hornby is the movie script and the ohter is the actual story itself.
I am very upset and shocked to learn that the book I purchased is not the novel, it is the screen play. It does not say anywhere in the description that it is a screen play. I am upset I paid money for this. Don't buy it:(
In a whirlwind tour of expanding horizons, the plot suspense centers around the question: Will she wreck her life, and just how badly?

I give this screenplay-book 5 stars, for 3 reasons:

(1) the spot-on description of a teenage girl (Jenny) getting to know people who are exciting, glamorous, and worldly and who have different values and ethics than her family. She is not honest when discussing them with her parents, and not entirely honest with herself.

(2) Although very entertaining, there are some major life lessons in this book, some more subtle than others. Because of this, it seems a good gift for teen girls, although I know some women in their 40's who still haven't figured out some of the lessons. As a gift idea for teen girls, be aware that it frankly discusses some topics, and some parents may object to that.

(3) The writing is much better quality than most screenplays (although that is faint praise, because most screenplays are so bad).

Reading this took me back in time to my teen years; I remember having many of the same thoughts and attitudes as Jenny. There but for the grace of God ...

A quote from Hornby that describes Lynn Barber (and Jenny) as "a suburban girl who's frightened that she's going to get cut out of everything good that happens in the city".

This book is set in the 1960's in a household that seems conservative today. Younger readers may be surprised by the parents' attitude towards young marriage, and the widespread expectation that respectable married women would not have careers or educational goals.

This book is inspired by a memoir by Lynn Barber, reworked by Nick Hornby into a screenplay version, with some fictionalized details. I have not yet read the complete memoir by Lynn Barber, but plan to.
The picture on the back of Nick Hornby's An Education contextualizes the central fight, for me, of the screenplay. David, Jenny, and Jenny's parents are standing in their living room. David is looking at Jack with soft yet deliberate charm. Jack is looking at David with a father's evaluation. Jenny is looking at her father uncertain, but surprised, about what's happening. Jenny's mom is looking at David, smitten. Which man is the right man: David, with his savoir faire, or the sensible, fatherly, Jack?

David's character is understandably attractive to Jenny: he has a sports car, knows the best night clubs, goes to art auctions, takes trips to Paris, and uses charm instead of hesitation. Jenny's dad is, well, her dad.

David's image is largely from the trappings of wealth, and the screenplay lends itself to an argument about a man's character and the source of his money, but I don't think it's a good one. There're certainly ethical issues: some theft, and real estate deals taking advantage of buyers who don't know any better. But a person can make money in questionable ways and be tortured by it. David's not tortured, though he's not a villain, either.

Hornby based this screenplay off a short story memoir. It's invention on top on invention on top of a real story, then. Jack and David were deliberately created for the screen, and they seem to characterize William James's self esteem equation. James says a person's self esteem is accomplishments divided by pretenses. A person can increase her self esteem by increasing her accomplishments; though, he argues, it's easier to do so by decreasing pretension. David seems to have that ratio backward: his self esteem comes from pretense.

And that's probably because he doesn't care about anything. The only moments he seems to be a man are when he's walking up to a door to con somebody. It's an Instagram image: deriving character from the image of doing a thing, instead of doing something meaningful. David comes across mature when he gives off the image of doing work.

This is sharply contrasted by Jenny's father. He's dull, risk averse, and cares about his daughter. In some cases he comes across uncultured and suburban, but, more often, he comes across as a strong father. What's important, though, as in a lot of cases, is what's unseen. Jack was once young. Presumably he had the same self certainty that most young people do, and the interest and know how of city life that David does. Jack became Jack. It doesn't seem he was forced to. Growing, for him, was natural, and had a strong element of choice.

Much of this movie is built on conversations and how they take place. A person who can connect in conversation has a certain degree of substance. Jokes and charm can be distancing. At the end, David and Jack have to talk to Jenny. It's uncertain whether David lies to Jenny when he says he loves her and wants to divorce his wife. And there is indeed logic to waiting a day to talk to her parents. However, while doing so will let some air into the situation, it also puts immediate burden on Jenny, because she has no choice not to see her parents. It's a matter of character, then, to talk to them the same night. He has to, to save her.

A man gets only so many chances to prove his character. Eventually, he has to grow up.
Jenny wants to be anything but ordinary. In this coming-of-age story, she dreams of a world full of music and dance, while in reality she's stuck in 1960s suburban London. That is until David, an older man, walks into her life and takes her on a whirlwind of a journey, where she loses not just her innocence but a bit of herself at the same time. Hornby's script is excellent, truly showing a middle-class London from yesteryear and wonderfully drawn characters inhabiting the streets. The characters are vivid and interesting, always with a motive. And the diary, which is included with the script, offers an interesting inside look at not just the writing process, but the creation of the film.