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Golem's Mighty Swing epub

by James Sturm


Golem's Mighty Swing epub

ISBN: 0606279873

ISBN13: 978-0606279871

Author: James Sturm

Category: Comics and Graphics

Subcategory: Publishers

Language: English

Publisher: Demco Media (April 1, 2002)

ePUB book: 1211 kb

FB2 book: 1815 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 632

Other Formats: lrf mobi lit azw





The Golem's Mighty Swing works both as a tale of Prohibition-era barnstorming baseball and as a tale of ethnic relations. James Sturm sharply observes the baseball details, including a number of interesting and authentic-sounding anecdotes about the game.

The Golem's Mighty Swing works both as a tale of Prohibition-era barnstorming baseball and as a tale of ethnic relations. And by telling the story through the eyes of a man who is accustomed to the prejudiced attitudes of the day, Sturm gives us not a rabble-rousing screed with the obvious moral that anti-Semitism is bad, but a highly evocative portrait of life as an ethnic outsider that gives us some feeling for what it's actually like.

The Golem's Mighty Swing The Revival Hundreds of Feet Below Daylight Fantastic Four .

The Golem's Mighty Swing The Revival Hundreds of Feet Below Daylight Fantastic Four: Unstable Molecules. James Sturm (born 1965) is an American cartoonist and co-founder of the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, Vermont  .

JAMES STURM’S GRAPHIC NARRATIVES are strongly grounded in American history, drawing upon this history to tell . You loosely based your squad in The Golem’s Mighty Swing on a Christian team, the House of David.

JAMES STURM’S GRAPHIC NARRATIVES are strongly grounded in American history, drawing upon this history to tell fictional stories with ongoing relevance. Sturm’s 1996 The Revival takes up the 1801 Christian pilgrim mass gathering at Cane Ridge, Kentucky, tells of a couple who hope to resurrect their recently deceased daughter. Through highly expressive drawings, Sturm conveys the pain of a child’s loss, the couple’s descent into religious fervor, and their subsequent disillusionment.

The Golem's Mighty Swing book.

Praise for The Golem's Mighty Swing. James Sturm shows us what America wishes it had been, and what America actually was. James Sturm's graphic narratives are strongly grounded in American history, drawing upon this history to tell fictional stories with ongoing relevance. By rubbing the rose tint from our memories, he uncovers our nation's truest self. We might want American history - and especially American sports history - to be a tidy collection of fables with easy-to-grasp morals.

The Golem’s Mighty Swing Interior Art by James Sturm. Paste: Did you play sports growing up, and are/were you a baseball fan? Sturm: I found the high school sports culture toxic, but my geeky friends enjoyed playing all kinds of sports from handball to stickball to basketball. I still play pick-up basketball. I’ve been a Mets fan since I was a kid and still follow the team. I love listening to baseball. Paste: How did you develop your cast of characters for the book?

James Sturm lives in White River Junction, Vermont, with his wife and two daughters, where he helps run a cartooning school that he co-founded, The Center for Cartoon Studies. James books include Market Day, James Sturm s America, Satchel Paige: Striking Out Jim Crow, The Fantastic Four: Unstable Molecules, Denys Wortman s New York, and the popular Adventures in Cartooning series.

James Sturm lives in White River Junction, Vermont, with his wife and two daughters, where he helps run a cartooning school that he co-founded, The Center for Cartoon Studies.

item 1 The Golem's Mighty Swing New Paperback Book -The Golem's Mighty Swing New Paperback Book. item 2 The Golem's Mighty Swing by Sturm, James -The Golem's Mighty Swing by Sturm, James. James Sturm lives in White River Junction, Vermont, with his wife and two daughters, where he helps run a cartooning school that he co-founded, The Center for Cartoon Studies.

An agent from an entertainment agency. James’ books include Market Day, James Sturm’s America, Satchel Paige: Striking Out Jim Crow, The Fantastic Four: Unstable Molecules, Denys Wortman’s New York, and the popular Adventures in Cartooning series.

James Sturm pens this richly evocative graphic novel set in the 1920s. A great book for baseball and comic fans alike, soon to be collected with other James Sturm works in James Sturm's America: God, Gold, and Golems. Get yourself a Golem.

A great book for baseball and comic fans alike, soon to be collected with other James Sturm works in James Sturm's America: God, Gold, and Golems. Published by Thriftbooks.

A birthday gift for my nephew who loves sports including baseball.
This was a great little graphic novel about a ragtag Jewish baseball team The Stars of David early in the 20th century. It is part sports drama, part vaudevillian showcase, and part historical footnote commenting on the antisemitic tendencies of some backward small towns.

With beautiful art and a simple narrative, the book turns the spectacle of America’s greatest pastime into a mythical battle of epic proportions on the field of America’s history of racial and religious intolerance.

My only complaint about this book - and it is truly a taste one - is that I was not a fan of the pages of play-by-play. The rest of the book - all the dramatic action and gorgeous artwork and simple dialogue-less frames were beautiful and touching.
The Golem's Mighty Swing, by James Sturm (108 pgs., 2001, 2002, 2003).
This is an adult graphic novel. It's exciting to see how this genre has grown out of children's comic books & now has such an important role in book publishing. Like Hollywood, most of the founders of this genre were Jewish, with Will Eisner (of blessed memory) being considered the father of it all. Maus, by Seligman became the first huge best seller that came out of this genre.
This graphic novel combines the Jewish fable of the Golem with the historical reality of traveling professional baseball teams playing throughout small-town America in the years between the two World Wars. Sturm has done an excellent job of bringing this part of history alive through his drawings & his dialogue. There were traveling Jewish baseball clubs. They did face anti-Semitism in many of the towns they played in. The Golem is an actual Jewish fable. Plays & books have been written about it. In the end the Golem always brings sadness.
Most graphic novels are slim, like this one. I would like to see some of these writer and illustrators tackle big subjects in longer many paged graphic novels of 300+ pages. I think that so far, Seligman has been the only one to explore such longer lengths.
Comics about history are rarities in this country. Comics about baseball are even more rare. Here, James Sturm has combined both to create an elegant graphic novel about a barnstorming squad in the 1920s. The gimmick behind this squad, The Stars of David, is that the players are all bearded Jews. Kind of.
The manager, fierce-looking Noah Strauss, a former bench player for the Red Sox, fields a team that also features his younger brother, Mo, a kid with huge potential if he can keep his head on straight. Mo's a little young to grow a beard, so he improvises. Noah also fudges the lineup by adding a former Negro-Leagues slugger, Henry Bell, billing him as Hershl Bloom, "a member of the lost tribe." Barnstorming is a tough business, and, strapped for cash when the team bus dies, Noah accepts a promoter's offer of a big pay day if Henry will wear the recently acquired monster costume from the contemporary German horror movie smash, THE GOLEM.
The proposed match-up with an enhanced upstate New York factory team carries electrifying potential when the hype-machine rouses an anti-Semitic furor. Despite the tension he creates, artist Sturm delivers a narrative that captures the rhythms, suspense, and gamesmanship of a great baseball match. In this tale, he looks at what baseball means to its fans, what America looked like to its immigrants, and how both of these themes lend themselves to great storytelling. All this comes with clean, well-designed artwork that represents an object lesson on the principles of great comic art. Fans of non-superhero comics will enjoy this book for its craftsmanship, while fans of baseball history will love the story.
The Golem's Mighty Swing works both as a tale of Prohibition-era barnstorming baseball and as a tale of ethnic relations. James Sturm sharply observes the baseball details, including a number of interesting and authentic-sounding anecdotes about the game. And by telling the story through the eyes of a man who is accustomed to the prejudiced attitudes of the day, Sturm gives us not a rabble-rousing screed with the obvious moral that anti-Semitism is bad, but a highly evocative portrait of life as an ethnic outsider that gives us some feeling for what it's actually like.

Sturm's art is clean and says a lot with a little, as other reviewers have said. But Sturm's talent for saying a lot with a little is true of his prose as well. For a hundred-page comic, this book has a remarkable number of memorable and realistic characters. Also, the book design itself, from the color of the pages to the art inside the front covers, gives a retro feel that enhances the mood of the story.

Sturm obviously sweated the details to create something as simple in outline yet as emotionally and thematically complex as The Golem's Mighty Swing. His effort pays off. The Golem's Mighty Swing effortlessly sweeps the reader up in the story, the characters, and the setting, making for a quick read at first, and then a thoughtful mood after the reading is done.