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Scrumban - Essays on Kanban Systems for Lean Software Development (Modus Cooperandi Lean) epub

by Corey Ladas


Scrumban - Essays on Kanban Systems for Lean Software Development (Modus Cooperandi Lean) epub

ISBN: 0578002140

ISBN13: 978-0578002149

Author: Corey Ladas

Category: Business books

Subcategory: Management & Leadership

Language: English

Publisher: Modus Cooperandi Press (January 12, 2009)

Pages: 180 pages

ePUB book: 1126 kb

FB2 book: 1762 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 810

Other Formats: mbr txt lrf lrf





Corey Ladas' groundbreaking paper ScrumBan has captured the imagination of the software development world. Scrum and agile methodologies have helped software development teams organize and become more efficient. Lean methods like kanban can extend these benefits.

Corey Ladas' groundbreaking paper ScrumBan has captured the imagination of the software development world. Kanban also provides a powerful mechanism to identify process improvement opportunities. This book covers some of the metrics and day-to-day management techniques that make continuous improvement an achievable outcome in the real world

Corey Ladas applies lean thinking to software development and, in general it is a good thought experiment. I like a lot what is in there and it helps me think through the things I need to say to my clients. But I have two big "howevers".

Corey Ladas applies lean thinking to software development and, in general it is a good thought experiment. First, why is every kanban and lean thinking book, this included, trying to compare software development to Toyota's manufacturing line? There isn't much overlap between software development and a manufacturing line except the unfortunate terms we use. Software development is all design, even coding is designing instructions for a compiler.

As described in books on Kanban for software development, the two primary practices of Kanban are . a b c Corey, Ladas (2008). Scrumban and other essays on Kanban System for Lean Software develoment. Seattle, Washington: Modus Cooperandi Press.

As described in books on Kanban for software development, the two primary practices of Kanban are: Visualize your work. Limit work in progress (WIP).

Top 11 Lean/ Kanban Books for IT, Software and Knowledge Work! . The book contains a series of essays that give practitioners the background needed to create more robust software development practices, combining the best of Agile and Lean. 9. Kanban in Action – By Joakim Sunden and Marcus Hammarberg. 360 pages, ET to Read:6 hours, Published March 17, 2014, by Manning Publications).

The book has visible damages (like underlining and highlighting sentences) but remains in good working condition. Fast delivery and a good book for reading.

Corey Ladas' groundbreaking paper "ScrumBan" has captured the imagination of the software development world. This book covers some of the metrics and day-to-day management techniques that make continuous improvement an achievable outcome in the real world.

Published January 12th 2008 by Modus Cooperandi Press (first published 2008).

Corey Ladas' groundbreaking paper ScrumBan has captured the imagination. Start by marking Scrumban: Essays on Kanban Systems for Lean Software Development as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Published January 12th 2008 by Modus Cooperandi Press (first published 2008). Scrumban And Other Essays on Kanban Systems for Lean Software Development. 0578002140 (ISBN13: 9780578002149).

Corey Ladas is the pioneer of the Scrumban process framework, which allows for a cooperative team workflow

Project Management Books. by Moiz Noorani · Published February 22, 2014 · Updated February 22, 2014. We know about Scrum and Kanban as flavors of Agile development. Scrumban is a combination of best features of Scrum and Kanban. Content, Approach, Style. Corey Ladas is the pioneer of the Scrumban process framework, which allows for a cooperative team workflow.

A Scrumban book describing benefits of applying agile and lean methods. originally written by Corey Ladas. Number of pages: 160. Publisher: Modus Cooperandi Press. Publication date: January 2009. Read the real-life examples to find out how to achieve continuous improvement and streamline your process. Corey Ladas’ groundbreaking paper ScrumBan has captured the imagination of the software development world.

5 Lean & kanban Watch out for cargo cult kanban! .

Lean-Agile Software Development Achieving Enterprise Agility Alan Shalloway Guy Beaver James RTrott AAddis on-wesley Upper Saddle River NJ Boston Indianapolis San Francisco New York Toronto Montreal London. Operations Management.

Corey Ladas' groundbreaking paper "ScrumBan" has captured the imagination of the software development world. Scrum and agile methodologies have helped software development teams organize and become more efficient. Lean methods like kanban can extend these benefits. Kanban also provides a powerful mechanism to identify process improvement opportunities. This book covers some of the metrics and day-to-day management techniques that make continuous improvement an achievable outcome in the real world. ScrumBan the book provides a series of essays that give practitioners the background needed to create more robust practices combining the best of agile and lean.
Finally, someone wrote an essay (short book) that focuses on not just what kanban is, but how to make the most of it in software development. Nice job Corey!

I am a lead software developer for a medium sized company with a huge backlog of work and only three developers. I have always had an interest in lean methods in manufacturing and especially in services. It has been hard to see how lean can make the switch from the manufacturing arena to software development, but Corey does an amazing job of showing just how to do it. You must understand that unless you are wanting to make your software development process lean this book it almost useless. What it does do is layout in detail (with images) is how to use a kanban board to create a workflow of features in the life cycle of software development. Corey moves the reader from a brief (thank you) history of lean and lean tools right in to examples of how to use kanban for everyday work.

His ideas are great if you need to lead software development. Even if you are not in a lead position, Corey's book is worth the read to give you some ideas. We have one problem where I work and that is we have too much of a work backlog that has gotten out of hand. Corey describes how to make a kanban that prioritizes the work. That idea alone has been worth more than the $10 price.

If you are in an Agile shop and say we don't do lean, you'll be surprised at how the ideas in the book can make you even more agile and enable you to focus on the most important stories in your backlog. No book is filled on every page with take away's and this book is no different, but - you will not find a better book on creating great workflow for your development team.

A must read!
Corey Ladas offers a gentle, conversational, and opinionated introduction to kanban and pull systems in Scrumban. As Bas Vodde notes the title's a little misleading - but if you come from a Scrum background and you're encountering these ideas for the first time, it makes a lot of sense, because Corey introduces a continuum of possible software process outlines, explaining each evolution and the reasons for it.

I enjoyed this book because it's clear, it takes a stand, and Corey clearly states what's his opinion based on his experience. I don't agree with all of it - in particular I have trouble with the feature-brigade ideas at the end - but for walking through the basics of kanban and pull systems, focused on real workflows and not abstract theory, you can't beat it. It's short, concise, and well targeted to anyone who's already familiar with the ideas of Scrum and XP. Anyone who's doing Scrum should come to understand these ideas, to have greater insight into how their process is working, even if they don't implement them. They're useful thinking tools. (You NEED background in agile software development to make sense of this book, though.)

One of the biggest risks with an approach like this - one you -need- to mitigate - is promoting silos and handoffs, after all the work other agile methods have done to break down the walls. Corey notes this in passing - that you want to map the workflow of the work but avoid siloing people into activity boxes - but I worry he doesn't make this clear enough.
This book can be very interesting had Mr. Ladas hired an editor. In its current state it seems to be a stream of consciousness, without any logic or structure and is very hard to follow. Sentences do not connect to each other, paragraphs are broken in odd places and context switching make this book a difficult read. This is too bad, since the content has the potential of providing excellent value.
This book was my introduction to Kanban. Coming from a Scrum background it was really easy to understand how Kanban could make a difference and how the combination of the two approaches could bring added value to a team with the right maturity level in Scrum.
It reads like a mathematical and academic analysis of kanban. It might be valuable to those with a lot of experience in Kanban, but it's also very dry and sometimes sanctimonious, making it a hard read
This book is very interesting but in my personal opinion need more practical examples. Nevertheless I have enjoyed it from the beginning to the end.
More philosophical and dive to the roots and history of lean. Got couple of ideas anyway from it
Corey Ladas applies lean thinking to software development and, in general it is a good thought experiment. I like a lot what is in there and it helps me think through the things I need to say to my clients.

But I have two big "howevers".

First, why is every kanban and lean thinking book, this included, trying to compare software development to Toyota's manufacturing line? There isn't much overlap between software development and a manufacturing line except the unfortunate terms we use. Software development is all design, even coding is designing instructions for a compiler. The question shouldn't be how we do workflow in a manufacturing line but how do we do design and scale it. Fred Brooks recent book, the Design of Design, has important stuff on that.

Second is where do these nifty roughly equally sized work items for kanban come from? There is little to no discussion in this book (and many other software kanban books) where those wonderful work items come from. Most of my clients have these big feature ideas which take months to years to create with teams of 30 and I need a "feature" that is two weeks or less of work? Where did that come from? Who did that design?

Ladas does a fair job if you accept the two big "however" areas. This book is not for new people just trying to understand scrum and lean. It has a ton on insider references that can throw you off track if you are not familiar with them. Heck, I had to look up a few items and I am pretty well read. If you are a seasoned Scrum coach or aged methodologist, this book will give you good food for thought. Just keep the "howevers" in mind.