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Desert Redemption epub

by Scott Harrison Sutton


Desert Redemption epub

ISBN: 0828018324

ISBN13: 978-0828018326

Author: Scott Harrison Sutton

Category: Bibles

Subcategory: Literature & Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Review & Herald Publishing (January 11, 2005)

Pages: 300 pages

ePUB book: 1568 kb

FB2 book: 1953 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 553

Other Formats: rtf txt lrf mobi





Desert Redemption book.

Desert Redemption book. Matt Dury grew up in Nebraska, then turned his back on the cornfields  . Details (if other): Cancel.

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Scott Harrison Sutton's books. Scott Harrison Sutton’s Followers. None yet. Scott Harrison Sutton. Scott Harrison Sutton’s books.

Overall, I recommend this book not just for people in the non profit or social impact space but anyone that wants to create something that is bigger than just themselves.

His story will inspire you to think bigger, feel deeper, and give more. Overall, I recommend this book not just for people in the non profit or social impact space but anyone that wants to create something that is bigger than just themselves. Scott reiterates over and over in this book, that the success of Charity: Water is not just about him but rather his team, his board members, volunteers and donors that all come together to make this happen. Great book, engaging read and it will inspire you to do something great.

Город: New York CityПодписчиков: 87 ты. себе: Author of New York Times Bestsller, THIR. себе: Author of New York Times Bestsller, THIRST - A story of Redemption, Compassion, and a Mission to Bring Clean Water to the World. Founder, CEO of itywater

Today is Scott Harrison's live book signing! Join us at 5:15 PM EST as Scott signs copies of. .New York Times bestsellerAn inspiring personal story of redemption, second chances, and the transformative power within us all, from the founder and CEO of the nonprofit charity: water

If you’d like a signed copy from today’s event, there’s still time. New York Times bestsellerAn inspiring personal story of redemption, second chances, and the transformative power within us all, from the founder and CEO of the nonprofit charity: water

Scott Harrison was living a life that was as close to pure hedonism as you could come.

Scott Harrison was living a life that was as close to pure hedonism as you could come. In today's conversation, we dive deep into his personal journey, and also his current vision for both charity: water and the world of philanthropy in general.

Scott Harrison (born September 7, 1975) is the founder and current CEO of the non-profit charity: water. Harrison is the author of Thirst: A Story of Redemption, Compassion, and a Mission to Bring Clean Water to the World

Scott Harrison (born September 7, 1975) is the founder and current CEO of the non-profit charity: water. Harrison is the author of Thirst: A Story of Redemption, Compassion, and a Mission to Bring Clean Water to the World. Scott Harrison was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and grew up in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Harrison began working as a nightclub and party promoter in Manhattan.

Join Chase Jarvis, Scott Harrison for Lesson 1: Redemption and a Thirst for Change with Scott .

Join Chase Jarvis, Scott Harrison for Lesson 1: Redemption and a Thirst for Change with Scott Harrison of Redemption and a Thirst for Change on CreativeLive. Get started on your creative journey with the best in creative education taught by world-class instructors. Watch a free lesson today. Redemption and a Thirst for Change with Scott Harrison.

Where's Janda?

Matt Dury grew up in Nebraska, then turned his back on the cornfields. Now he teaches in Dubai at an English as a Second Language school. He's passionately in love with Lola, a Filipino nurse at the Adventist hospital. There's something different about Lola--with her lovely dark-almond eyes, her imperturbable faith in God, and her constant refrain whenever he proposed marriage: "Let's wait."

Lola, you see, wants to marry an Adventist--someone who shares her values and beliefs. "Please, God, help me know what to do about Matt," she sobs.

Janda is a Muslim boy of 10. First he stole their hearts, then thugs stole him--and made him a camel jockey. In hot pursuit, Matt heads for exotic Dubai. Before it's over, they would all experience a new intensity in prayer.

As Matt disentangles the dark threads of his past against an international canvas of suspense and intrigue, he struggles with what the Bible teaches about death and the Sabbath. In this richly textured tale of spiritual coming of age in a Muslim country, you will learn what Islam and Christianity share in common and get acquainted with contemporary Christian life in a Gulf Arab state.

First: if you are a Seventh-day Adventist and rarely read any non-Adventist literature, you should pick up this book. There are some important perspectives in the book that much of Adventist literature is lacking.

Second: if you read voraciously and are looking for another book to devour, you should consider the following.
The characters are simple and the writing inflated. People in the novel are flat and are almost entirely good or bad. Despite some decent vocabulary the descriptions seem overstated and dull while the sentence structure reminds me of books I read in the sixth grade. Come to think of it, the whole book is like something I would have read in sixth grade and never picked up to read again; the story has a predictable ending with all the loose ends tied up. It was also frustrating to read because the dialog and writing don't change with a change in character perspective or when the book moves from narrative to journal.
The depiction of struggling to leave and reconcile Nebraska is also very frustrating. Willa Cather explores the theme of leaving a home with better writing and more feeling in The Song of the Lark. Not fitting in is better explored by Steinbeck in The Moon is Down.
The one good point of this book is that it shows the common ground between Muslims and Christians. But this point is not well done; he trips overhimself to say this and ends up making the agreement sound corny.
With descriptions that will lead the most stay-at-home Midwesterners to the far reaches of Nepal and Pakistan, back to a more familiar Nebraska landscape then ultimately to the ultra-modern yet ancient world of Dubai, Desert Redemption challenges the reader with a series of finely interwoven journeys.

In a style and quality reminiscent of 19th century classics, the author's descriptive and easy to read prose surrounds the reader with the humanity packed streets of Karachi, yet allows us to feel the loneliness of one man who yearns for love. Flashbacks provide insight into his life-long search for belonging and a sense of God's purpose--the whys of his life now. International intrigue draws him to search for a stolen child in Dubai. Leaving the woman he loves in Karachi tears his soul asunder as he ponders how this love might bring their different worlds together. The discoveries--both internal insight and a continued wonder of the world around him--and the friendships he makes along the way, are truly inspirational and show the world to be much smaller than we imagine.
I read the same book as another reviewer, but I have to say that I was obviously reading a very different book. I know nothing about Seventh Day Adventist literature and came to the text as a general reader who reads `voraciously' I didn't find anything wrong with the sentence structure at all. The blurb on the back makes it clear that the guy is an English teacher and so you wouldn't expect to. The Gulf is a part of the world I have lived in and the book evokes the desert environment and the modernizing cities of Arabia very well. I didn't find the characters simplistic and the story is surely relevant to anybody wishing to gain a better understanding of the region. It doesn't go around reinforcing stereotypes at all, it belies them. Also to compare canonical literary texts with a first novel is seriously unfair. No doubt there are better descriptions in Steinbeck and Cather and of course, there should be. There are better descriptions in those texts than in most world literature. I, for one, thoroughly enjoyed the book and learned a lot about the region in the process.

Philip Matheson
The book Desert Redemption encapsulates mystery,religious belief and the spirit of Dubai in a finely woven story involving characters that come alive. The sights,smells and sounds of the various places featured in the book transport one to this magical Middle Eastern city. I for one was absolutely thrilled to read about my favourite places in a city I have lived in for the past 21 years! The book was too good to put down, and I read it through to the end, compelled by an intriguing storyline and the language in which it is couched. Some down-to- earth characters and the setting make it a "must read" book on every avid reader's list.

Looking forward to the next book by Scott Harrison Sutton!