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Light of Eidon (Legends of the Guardian-King, Book 1) epub

by Karen Hancock


Light of Eidon (Legends of the Guardian-King, Book 1) epub

ISBN: 0764227947

ISBN13: 978-0764227943

Author: Karen Hancock

Category: Bibles

Subcategory: Literature & Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Bethany House Publishers (July 1, 2003)

Pages: 432 pages

ePUB book: 1537 kb

FB2 book: 1943 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 919

Other Formats: mbr rtf txt lrf





Karen Hancock fits that small niche reserved for today’s finest novelists as she implants solid truth into words with . Return of the Guardian-King. KAREN HANCOCK graduated in 1975 from the University of Arizona with bachelor’s degrees in Biology and Wildlife Biology

Karen Hancock fits that small niche reserved for today’s finest novelists as she implants solid truth into words with which I can identify, words that fascinate and cut to the heart. The Light of Eidon is far more than a novel of fantasy or allegory-it is a word picture of the ancient struggle between Light and darkness. Hannah Alexander, author of Urgent Care and The Crystal Cavern. KAREN HANCOCK graduated in 1975 from the University of Arizona with bachelor’s degrees in Biology and Wildlife Biology. Along with writing, she is a semi-professional watercolorist and has exhibited her work in a number of national juried shows.

he was before it. They’d arrived here in Vorta yesterday, just in time to take part in the opening procession of warriors last night. Dressed only in their loincloths, they had, with the other slaves who would participate in the coming contests, been marched in a long line around the sand-packed oblong floor of the Ul Manus Arena for the crowd to inspect

Written by Karen Hancock, the acclaimed author of Arena.

Set in a world of swords and cloaks, of glittering palaces and mystical temples, of galley ships and ancient, mist-bound cities, his journey illustrates how God pursues and how He uses suffering to mold His children into something greater than was ever thought possible. Written by Karen Hancock, the acclaimed author of Arena

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Light Of Eidon (Legends of the Guardian-King as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Written by Karen Hancock, the acclaimed author of Arena. Written by Karen Hancock, the acclaimed author of Arena.

You name it! Classic story of good vs evil, but very unlike others of this genre

You name it! Classic story of good vs evil, but very unlike others of this genre. A spiritual journey you won't want to miss!

The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.

The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword is a 2017 epic fantasy action adventure film directed by Guy Ritchie who co-wrote the film with Joby Harold and Lionel Wigram from a story by Harold and David Dobkin, inspired by Arthurian legends.

Book 1 of 4 in Legends Of The Guardian-King Series (4 Book Series). The Light of Eidon deals with just such a young man; Abramm has always wanted to serve Eidon, but not only does he find out that the religion he's been raised in is corrupt, but it's also actively against Eidon. The real followers of Eidon are the group called Terstans, but they are called heretics by the popular religion-and they give themselves a black eye, in fact, because many of them are backsliders, and backsliders become physically diseased.

Legends of the Guardian King, book 2, from the award-winning author of Arena. Four years have passed since the conclusion of The Light of Eidon. Karen Hancock brings to imaginative life the supernatural battle between good and evil, the preconceptions that keep us from embracing truth, and the distortions that trick and trap us. Abramm has been living peacefully abroad, but when he hears of trouble in his homeland, he returns to claim the crown he thought he'd never wear. But he has many enemies, including his murderous brother.

Book 1 of Legends of the Guardian King which follows the life of Abramm Kalladorne in his turbulent search for truth and self--a search that will transform him from a sickly, head-in-the-clouds youth to a legendary hero of strength and courage. Set in a world of swords and cloaks, of glittering palaces and mystical temples, of galley ships and ancient, mist-bound cities, his journey illustrates how God pursues and how He uses suffering to mold His children into something greater than was ever thought possible. Written by Karen Hancock, the acclaimed author of Arena.
This book is the beginning of what has to be one of the best Christian fantasy series I have ever read. I would recommend it for late teens and up.
All of his life, Abram Kalladorne has known the truth. His hunger for Eidon (God) quite frankly would put most of us to shame. And that's why he's been training with the Mataian brotherhood for the past five years. Besides, as the fifth son of the king of Kiriath, it's not as if there's anywhere else for him. Especially as he's always preferred his books to anything else, so the army's out.
But when Abram returns to Kiriath's capital for full initiation in to the brotherhood, he slowly comes to realize that all is not as it seems. What ensues is an odd combination of 'Ben-Hur' and 'The Hunger Games' (which no matter how strange it sounds, works) that completely shatters Abram's faith. But perhaps, just perhaps, there is more to Eidon and his plan than Abram ever thought possible, and his trials are also going to reforge and strengthen that faith.
Several other reviews have mentioned the extra-marital sex scene. Does it conform to Christian morality? Absolutely not. However, as the characters involved are not what I'll call 'saved', for lack of a better term in the book, at the time, that opens up a whole new can of worms. It is not explicit. It is regretted after, and it actually plays quite an important role in character development. To me, that and the point I saw the author trying to make with the scene, also make it not gratuitous. The author is not attempting to encourage or condone sex outside of marriage.
In some ways, then, this is something of your standard fantasy fare, in which the main character discovers the strength inside themselves and becomes not so useless, after all. Thing is, there's nothing wrong with that formula, because who doesn't want to see a character grow? And when you throw faith into the mix... Anyway, a wonderful story of 'what you intended for evil, God intended for good'.
I began this book with no idea what to expect, but soon found myself fully in the story. It's one I can relate to--a person who's spent his whole young life in pursuit of a dream, only to discover that what he thought he wanted was awful, fake, and evil. The Light of Eidon deals with just such a young man; Abramm has always wanted to serve Eidon, but not only does he find out that the religion he's been raised in is corrupt, but it's also actively against Eidon. The real followers of Eidon are the group called Terstans, but they are called heretics by the popular religion--and they give themselves a black eye, in fact, because many of them are backsliders, and backsliders become physically diseased. Most people only know the Terstans as diseased, insane people, so it's no wonder Terstans have a bad reputation.

Abramm's bitterness--and without giving the plot away by telling why he is bitter--leads him to atheism, and while he's at this low point, he falls in love with the girl. One reviewer of this book said it couldn't possibly be a Christian book since Abramm sleeps with the girl, and the writer is therefore glorifying sin. Well, #1, even real Christians still sin sometimes, and to acknowledge it is not to glorify it, but #2, Abramm was not even a believer in God at all when he was with the girl. The girl changed his life, found Eidon herself in a tragic moment, and indirectly led Abramm to discover the real Eidon as well, so I'm not going to fault the author for that.

But to portray this book as a simple Christian allegory would be to do a disservice to the story, because it's also a rollicking action-adventure (there's one point where Abramm is betrayed/rescued/betrayed/rescued/betrayed again that it is almost dizzying, and many things are not what they seem in the story. Give it a try, and don't be put off by the girl incident. Stay with the book until the end before you decide.
This is a complex story of political and religious rivalry, set in several nations of a fantasy world where supernatural powers intervene in human encounters. Spiritual bondage and fervour, cruel power struggles, brutal treatment of slaves and blow-for-blow accounts of battle to the death have the reader gasping with apprehension or seething with fury. But the main theme is the hero's spiritual journey from fervent submission to what turns out to be a subtle deceiver – through selfish atheism – to final acknowledgement of the truth and kindness of the God he has been fleeing from. The complex relationships between the various tribes and nations with their different religious allegiances, strange names and languages prove a challenge to the reader. The book is well written, the plot enthralling and the pacing is maintained throughout. I had reservations about what seemed to me gratuitous violence and the somewhat incongruous magical elements. Also, I have trouble accepting the idea that the supposedly true and good God not only condones but instrumentalises suffering and mass slaughter in order to woo a proselyte. Some apparently important characters (Saeral, Gillard, Shettai, Philip) seem to fizzle out in an unsatisfactory way.