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The Book of the Dun Cow epub

by Walter Wangerin Jr.


The Book of the Dun Cow epub

ISBN: 0060574607

ISBN13: 978-0060574604

Author: Walter Wangerin Jr.

Category: Bibles

Subcategory: Literature & Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: HarperOne; Anniversary edition (August 14, 2003)

Pages: 256 pages

ePUB book: 1990 kb

FB2 book: 1497 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 417

Other Formats: doc rtf docx mbr





The Book of the Dun Cow (1978) is a fantasy novel by Walter Wangerin, J. .

The Book of the Dun Cow (1978) is a fantasy novel by Walter Wangerin, J.It is loosely based upon the beast fable of Chanticleer and the Fox adapted from the story of "The Nun's Priest's Tale" from Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. It has two sequels: The Book of Sorrows (1985) and The Third Book of the Dun Cow: Peace at the Last (2013).

In the middle of the night somebody began to cry outside of Chauntecleer’s Coop. If it had been but a few sprinkled tears with nothing more than a moan or two, Chauntecleer would probably not have minded

A Division of Diversion Publishing Corp. 443 Park Avenue South, Suite 1004. New York, New York 10016. ISBN: 978-1-626810-7. In the middle of the night somebody began to cry outside of Chauntecleer’s Coop. If it had been but a few sprinkled tears with nothing more than a moan or two, Chauntecleer would probably not have minded. But this crying was more than a gentle moan.

Walter Wangerin's profound fantasy concerns a time when t.Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Book of the Dun Cow (Chauntecleer the Rooster, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

His other books include The Book of God, Ragman and Other Cries of Faith, and Miz .

His other books include The Book of God, Ragman and Other Cries of Faith, and Miz Lil and the Chronicles of Grace. It is simply a fantasy of good and evil. The story draws upon Geoffrey Chaucer, the early church fathers, medieval cosmologies, romances like Le Morte D’Arthur, various mythological figures, and Biblical patterns.

ion ever so slightly. Immediately his senses quivered, alert. She said, Beryl was a good nurse. Chauntecleer nearly made a noise of agreement, nearly sought to start conversation. But he thought better of it. This sacrifice was not meant for her, Pertelote said

The Book of the Dun Cow. Walter Wangerin Jr. Walter Wangerin's profound fantasy concerns a time when the sun turned around the earth and the animals could speak, when Chauntecleer the Rooster ruled over a more or less peaceful kingdom.

The Book of the Dun Cow. What the animals did not know was that they were the Keepers of Wyrm, monster of evil long imprisoned beneath the earth. and Wyrm, sub terra, was breaking free.

Walter Wangerin's profound fantasy concerns a time when the sun turned around the earth and the animals could speak, when Chauntecleer the Rooster ruled over a more or less peaceful kingdom. Attn: Author/Narrator If you have any queries please contact me at info19782 @ gmail. I will reply as soon as possible, usually within 24 hours.

Beginning with the renowned Book of the Dun Cow, Wangerin’s writing career has encompassed almost every genre: fiction, essay, spirituality, children’s stories, and biblical exposition

Beginning with the renowned Book of the Dun Cow, Wangerin’s writing career has encompassed almost every genre: fiction, essay, spirituality, children’s stories, and biblical exposition. Wangerin has won the National Book Award, the New York Times Best Children’s Book of the Year Award, and several Gold Medallion Awards, including best fiction awards for both The Book of God and Paul: A Novel

Walter Wangerin's profound fantasy concerns a time when the sun turned around the earth and the animals could speak, when Chauntecleer the Rooster ruled over a more or less peaceful kingdom. If anyone had told me before I read this Book of the Dun Cow, that it should surpass Watership Down, that I should stand in awe of a cow the way I stood for Galadriel, that I should fear maggots and a simple cockatrice more than any foul thing born in the darks of Mordor, that my mind should be as stirred by.

Walter Wangerin's profound fantasy concerns a time when the sun turned around the earth and the animals could speak, when Chauntecleer the Rooster ruled over a more or less peaceful kingdom. What the animals did not know was that they were the Keepers of Wyrm, monster of evil long imprisoned beneath the earth ... and Wyrm, sub terra, was breaking free.

I thought The Book of the Dunn Cow was a children’s book, it is not. I wouldn’t recommend the book for children. I think it may be acceptable for teenagers, but with caution. There are a series of adult rated events and it includes vivid violence. There are no humans in the story, animals only. The book is written well, excellent storyline, and character development. In the afterward, Wangerin assures the reader that his story is not an allegory. It is a “beast fable;” Wangerin was inspired by several sources, but the story is completely original. This is the first book of a three book series.

This world is different than the one we know. It is filled with talking animals. The animals live on the surface of the earth and one creature lives within. The evil creature is named “Wyrm,” a massive dreadful serpent; “He was angry. And he hated, with an abiding hatred, the God who had locked him within the earth. And what put the edge upon his hatred, what made it an everlasting acid inside of him, was the knowledge that God had given the key his prison in this bottomless pit to a pack of chattering animals.” (p. 23-24) The animals are the keepers and there are only a few which maintain a lord/leadership status. Chauntecleer the rooster, one of the main characters (lord) and heroes of the story, knew nothing about Wyrm. No animal had knowledge of Wyrm.
I usually am not an "Animal Fantasy" enthusiast, but the title of this novel compelled me. I'm certainly glad I listened to this book! Walter Wangerin, Jr. is a unique author who introduces compelling themes in interesting ways.

A coop of barnyard animals, led by the headstrong rooster Chaunticleer, live the way animals do. Everyday, they go about their business, and observe "The Cannonical Crows" of worship to God made by their leader. Little do the animals know that God has appointed them to be the "keepers" of an imprisoned evil. Worm, God's enemy, has been imprisoned under the earth. Determined to break free, he insinuates himself into the dreams of Sinex, a rooster who rules another coop in another land. Through his seduction, Sinex defies the natural order and lays an egg. From this abomination is hatched Cockatrice, a tyrannical monster half-rooster, half-serpent. Killing Sinex, Cockatrice begins his malevolent rule. It is up to Chaunticleer and his unruly band of animals to fight the evil force that has entered their world.

I realize from this synopsis that you may b confused. Don't worry. Wangerin tells his story in a simple yet poignant fashion. All the animals embody human characteristics, and the author emphasizes that those who are the most faithful may be the people whom we least expect. This book has excellent symbolism, particularly Wangerin's unique portrayal of a Christ-like figure, "The Dun Cow."

Paul Michael reads the audio version with wonderful feeling. His deep-toned voice is easy on the ear, and his many character voices are wonderful. I did not particularly care for the Southern accent employed for the characters of Chaunticleer and his wife, but I think the other voices fit their characters well. The final reason I give this book only four stars is the occasional uses of profanity that slightly surprised me in a Christian fiction book. However, the instances are so few they should not hinder you from enjoying this intriguing novel. Remember that there are some violent scenes, so some very young children might need to be cautious.

All in all, I definitely recommend this unique book. God bless you.
This ain't your hyped-up alien conspiracy book, or your crazy new fad dieting book. This here is something truly different. At first glance, it seems to be a typical talking barnyard animal fable, but when the Cockatrice is born from a creature beneath the Earth, the whole barnyard atmosphere is instantly tossed asunder. I was disappointed to see that author Walter Wangerin didn't in fact invent the snake/rooster monster that is the Cockatrice, but it's neat how he weaved a lesser-known mythological creature into his barnyard tale.

The Cockatrice may be the most evil villian in any book I've ever read, even more so than Dicken's Quilp, so naturally I thought, "Hey, this book is pretty good." I even like the hero of the book - the plain, ordinary rooster Chauntecleer. He's pretty sour for a hero, always mad about something. It's funny.

Even though the violence in this book is extraordinarily plentiful, and Chauntecleer's dream about the river is as heavily powerful and frightening as drama can get, the book manages to end in a light-hearted comical routine between Chauntecleer and a wacky weasel. Strange, strange, strange.

The whole Earth is left with a literal scar after the events in this book take place, and I can definitely see how one can interpret this particular scenario Biblically. Biblical themes abound in the text, but I found the Earth's scar example to be the most obvious. Also of note - The Dun Cow herself seems to be some kind of representation of the Holy Spirit.

One thing I really like about this book is it makes you want to read the sequel without putting any kind of "To Be Continued" message at the end. Of course, it leaves the possibility for a sequel open, but doesn't demand that the possibility be met.

Overall, an awesome book. The worst thing I can say about it is there's a typo in the table of contents, and I wasn't too crazy about Mundo Cani Dog. Everything else is gold.