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The Preacher's Portrait: Some New Testament Word Studies epub

by Mr. John Stott


The Preacher's Portrait: Some New Testament Word Studies epub

ISBN: 0802811914

ISBN13: 978-0802811912

Author: Mr. John Stott

Category: Bibles

Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference

Language: English

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company (November 9, 1988)

Pages: 132 pages

ePUB book: 1285 kb

FB2 book: 1260 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 990

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The Preacher's Portrait book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Preacher's Portrait: Some New Testament Word Studies as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

The Preacher's Portrait book. Start by marking The Preacher's Portrait: Some New Testament Word Studies as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Stott takes a fresh look at some of the words used in the New Testament to describe the preacher and his . This book is a must read for preachers. John Stott was born in London, England on April 27, 1921. He converted to Christianity in 1938.

This book is a must read for preachers. Пользовательский отзыв - Angelo Beard - Christianbook. As a preacher of the gospel for 32 years and a pastor for 8 this is a book that I feel every preacher should read over and over no matter how long you have been in the ministry. It will help you stay on track thank God for Dr. John .

The Preacher's Portrait : Some New Testament Word Studies

The Preacher's Portrait : Some New Testament Word Studies.

An excellent read The fact that it is John Stott (an evangelical Anglican who is now cozier with the Catholics than those in the "high church" and heirs o. .

com An excellent read. Stott considers the preacher as a steward (a preacher's proclamation and appeal), a herald (a preacher's message and authority), a witness (a preacher's experience and humility), a father (a preacher's love and gentleness), and a servant (a preacher's power and motive). There is one chapter for each portrait. The fact that it is John Stott (an evangelical Anglican who is now cozier with the Catholics than those in the "high church" and heirs of the Tractarian Movement ever were) is troubling.

Convinced that knowing the Word of God is fundamental to preaching, John Stott here presents brief studies of five New Testament .

Convinced that knowing the Word of God is fundamental to preaching, John Stott here presents brief studies of five New Testament metaphors that characterize preachers: steward, herald, witness, father, and servant.

Published online by Cambridge University Press: 02 February 2009. Export citation Request permission.

The Preacher’s Portrait: Five New Testament Word Studies

The Preacher’s Portrait: Five New Testament Word Studies. In this updated version of The Preacher’s Portrait John Stott presents a portrait of the ideal preacher; a portrait painted by the hand of God himself on the broad canvas of the New Testament. Through studying five roles of a preacher – steward, herald, witness, father, and servant – Stott illustrates God’s ideal for a preacher’s character, message and purpose. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

The Preacher’s Portrait; Some New Testament Word Studies. What Christ Thinks of the Church: Expository Addresses on the First Three Chapters of the Book of Revelation. Why I Am a Christian. The Radical Disciple: Some Neglected Aspects of Our Calling. Downers Grove, Ill: IVP Books, 2010. Romans: God’s Good News for the World.

In this updated version of The Preacher’s Portrait John Stott presents a portrait of the ideal preacher; a portrait painted by the hand of God himself on the broad canvas of the New Testament

In this updated version of The Preacher’s Portrait John Stott presents a portrait of the ideal preacher; a portrait painted by the hand of God himself on the broad canvas of the New Testament. First, this book is a gem. If I taught preaching, in a heartbeat, this book would be required reading! Stott does a wonderful job of writing with clarity, precision, imagination, and passion so as to help preachers get their identity from Scripture rather than the business world, popular culture, or TED talks.

Stott takes a fresh look at some of the words used in the New Testament to describe the preacher and his task in order to gain a clearer view of God's revealed ideal for the preacher-what he is and how he is to do his work.
I am so thankful this book came my way. It has brought a fresh and biblical perspective to my divine mission as a minister of this glorious gospel. I love the flow and structure of this book. Taking key New Testament terms that describe and amplify the ministers actions and attitudes. I would recommend this book to any preacher!
This is one of my studys for my Bachelor Degree in Ministry. This is ful of helpfull information and John Slott has written many fantastic books.
I purchased this book for my son for school.
I thought that I was getting the edition that was in the picture.
In the twentieth century, John Stott was a gift that kept on giving to the Christian Church. Yes, there were some theological issues on which I would differ with him. That said, he nonetheless contributed many valuable writings to the Church.

One of them was his little book, The Preacher's Portrait. Just five chapters and a little over a hundred pages in length, it can easily be read in one or two sittings. But don't let its brevity fool you: it is full of some very theological and practical helps to pastors.

The premise is simple: Stott looks at five words that are used to describe pastors in the New Testament, then extrapolates from them what his calling should be.

The first word is steward; or someone who manages something on behalf of its rightful owner. This makes sense for a pastor; after all, he does not proclaim his own word, guard his own flock, or protect his own made-up truths. Rather, a pastor proclaims God's Word, guards the flock of God's sheep that has been entrusted to him, and guards the Lord's truth.

Second, a pastor is a herald. That is to say, a pastor is called to go into the marketplace and proclaim salvation through Jesus Christ.

Within this, the pastor as herald must do two things: first, he must proclaim what God has done. As Stott notes, "[T]he gospel is not so fundamentally an invitation to men to do anything. It is a declaration of what God has done in Christ on the cross for their salvation. The invitation cannot properly be given before the declaration has been made. Men must ask the truth before they are asked to respond to it."

Third, a pastor is a witness. The Greek word used for this term is one that has been used in a court of law; one who testifies under oath what he has seen. But since we were not with Jesus physically in the first century, how are we to witness of Him?

Stott replies, "Our task is not to lecture about Jesus with philosophical detachment. We have become personally involved in Him. His revelation and redemption have changed our lives. Our eyes have been opened to see Him, and our ears unstopped to hear Him, as our Savior and our Lord. We are witnesses, so we must bear witness. Certainly we shall teach men systematically about Him, and we shall boldly herald the good news of what He has accomplished by His death. But we shall not fail to commend Him to our hearers out of our own personal experience."

Fourth, a pastor is a father. The reason for this is that, as Stott explains, "Preaching involves a personal relationship between preacher and congregation...A loving family relationship exists between them. They belong to each other."

This is primarily what people tend to look for in a pastor: they want someone who is going to care for them, show them compassion, and the tender love of Christ. Granted, this will sometimes entail a rebuke, but it should never be done harshly or with a wrong motive. Instead, it is to correct the person in question and lovingly show them how to live in a Christlike manner in light of God's grace.

On this word, Stott has a special word of admonition for pastors: "get to know your congregation. Empathize with them. This is crucial because many pastors won't know what some of his flock go through in their own lives (i.e., coping with a rebellious child, working with non-Christians, or go through a daily commute). And the congregation knows it.

"A father must also be gentle; that is, never unduly harsh. He must also be simple; that is, he must not preach in such a manner that his flock cannot understand him. A pastor must also be an example to the flock; they must be able, as Paul says, to imitate him as he imitates Christ. And lastly, a pastor must be a prayer. He must be on his knees, diligently praying for the sheep."

Fifth, the pastor is a servant. In demonstrating this, Stott shows how many of the preachers in first century Corinthians were showing reverence to various preachers who should have been showing it to God alone. This is an attitude which Paul had to correct. As he wrote in 1 Corinthians 3:5, "What then is Apollos? What is Paul? Servants through whom you believed, as the Lord assigned to each."

Based upon this, Stott shows how pastors must thrive not upon their own power, but on God's power, which He provides.

The above is merely a summary of each of these five points; Stott has far more to say about them than I could possibly repeat here. But this makes it a very worthwhile read. Future, brand-new, and longtime pastors will all benefit from reading The Preacher's Portrait. It will educate them on the multi-faceted nature of their calling, convict them of their unworthiness to perform their duties, and comfort them by reminding them of Christ's bountiful provision.

I highly recommend it.
From the back cover of the 1961 edition: ". . . should be on the required reading list of every Bible school, college, and seminary. . .This book should be placed in the hands of every man being ordained as a preacher and should be read before ordination."--Baptist Sunday School Board.
"One of the recurring needs of the pastor is to take a fresh look at the teaching of the Scriptures. The author accomplishes this. He makes all of Scripture speak to the problems of the modern preacher."--The National Lutheran.

Personally I am finding this book very insightful in its faithful treatment of the terms employed in the New Testament to describe the minister and his task. The chapter titles are:
I.A Steward--the preacher's proclamation and appeal
II.A Herald--the preacher's message and authority
III.A Witness--The preacher's experience and humility
IV.A Father--The preacher's love and gentleness
V.A Servant--The preacher's power and motive.
This book is powerful in that it puts front and center these biblical terms for the reader to chew on. It's a small book and doesn't attempt to be exhaustive, but it's scripturally weighty and wholesome. Definitely an edifying little book.
It seems flippant to say, "Buy everything this author writes," but it is a good rule of thumb. If John Stott is anything, he is solid. His teaching doesn't bend to the wave of the current craze. His personal life is like his writing, solid and deep.

This book is not about what the preacher does, but who the preacher is. I don't agree with everything Stott writes, but everything he writes is worth chewing on. In a world of turbulance caused by the shifting of professional winds, it's sort of nice to have an anchor.
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