» » Women, Slaves, and the Gender Debate: A Complementarian Response to the Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic

Women, Slaves, and the Gender Debate: A Complementarian Response to the Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic epub

by Benjamin Reaoch


Women, Slaves, and the Gender Debate: A Complementarian Response to the Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic epub

ISBN: 1596384018

ISBN13: 978-1596384019

Author: Benjamin Reaoch

Category: Bibles

Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference

Language: English

Publisher: P & R Publishing (July 31, 2012)

Pages: 224 pages

ePUB book: 1665 kb

FB2 book: 1779 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 386

Other Formats: lrf azw lit docx





Called a "complementarian response to the Redemptive Movement Hermeneutic," it provides a robust rebuttal to Webb's theory

Benjamin Reaoch is the pastor of Three Rivers Grace Church in Pittsburgh, PA. He is a graduate from Wheaton College, Wheaton, IL; his advanced degrees are from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky. Called a "complementarian response to the Redemptive Movement Hermeneutic," it provides a robust rebuttal to Webb's theory.

Puritan and Reformed books at discounted prices. The egalitarians’ redemptive-movement hermeneutic has gained support. In this careful scholarly work, Ben Reaoch examines this trajectory hermeneutic as it relates to both slavery and gender. Advocates concede many of the exegetical conclusions made by complementarians about relevant Bible passages, but then argue that elsewhere the Bible moves us beyond these specific instructions-e. the Bible commands slaves to submit to their masters, and yet basic principles in the Bible point toward the abolition of slavery. The contemporary generation of Christians should pay close attention to this debate.

The redemptive-movement hermeneutic is a new and seductive egalitarian argument. It is also a fascinating hermeneutical discussion as it relates to issues such as slavery. This book deals thoroughly with these issues from a complementarian perspective. Nov 22, 2017 Jimmy rated it it was amazing.

Benjamin Reaoch, a PhD graduate from The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and pastor of Three Rivers Grace Church in Pittsburgh, PA, critiques the redemptive-movement hermeneutic (henceforth RMH) used by many egalitarians. RMH-interpreters argue that there are indications in the Bible that move us beyond the specific instructions of the Bible and toward an ultimate ethic (p. xvii, emphasis original). Believers must follow the trajectory that the NT sets and even, in some cases, move beyond specific restrictions of women’s roles found in the NT.

August 15, 2012 History. found in the catalog

August 15, 2012 History. found in the catalog. Are you sure you want to remove Women, Slaves, and the Gender Debate: A Complementarian Response to the Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic from your list? Women, Slaves, and the Gender Debate: A Complementarian Response to the Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic. Published August 2012 by P & R Publisheing.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Women, Slaves, and the Gender Debate: A Complementarian . Life in the United Kingdom Handbook The Home Office by Great Britain (Paperback, 2013).

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to the Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic by Benjamin Reaoch. The Debate over the role of women in the church is not diminishing. Complementarians argue that men and women are equal but have distinctive roles, while egalitarians argue against role distinctions.

All about Women, Slaves, and the Gender Debate: A Complementarian Response to the Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic by Benjamin Reaoch. The egalitarians' redemptive-movement hermeneutic has gained support.

The egalitarians' redemptive-movement hermeneutic has gained support.

book by Benjamin Reaoch.

The author Benjamin Reaoch has done the church a service in writing this book. Reaoch first began with a fair description of the redemptive-movement hermeneutic and even with a discussion of the nineteenth-century slavery debate in the America. The book was adapted from the author’s doctoral dissertation at Southern Seminary. His adviser was the New Testament scholar Dr. Thomas Schreiner. While the latter might be more of a historical theology’s interests nevertheless since some of the academic discussions also brought up the abolitionists certainly it is worthwhile to consider their approach towards the Bible in regards to the slavery debate.

Women, Slaves, And The Gender Debate: A Complementarian Response To The Redemptive-movement Hermeneutic

Women, Slaves, And The Gender Debate: A Complementarian Response To The Redemptive-movement Hermeneutic. unknown, 2012 224 pages.

The debate over the role of women in the church is not diminishing. Complementarians argue that men and women are equal but have distinctive roles, while egalitarians argue against role distinctions.The egalitarians' redemptive-movement hermeneutic has gained support. Advocates concede many of the exegetical conclusions made by complementarians about relevant Bible passages, but then argue that elsewhere the Bible moves us beyond these specific instructions--e.g., the Bible commands slaves to submit to their masters, and yet basic principles in the Bible point toward the abolition of slavery. Is the issue of women's roles the same?This is a timely examination of the exegetical and hermeneutical questions, demonstrating the inconsistencies of adopting the egalitarians' hermeneutical approach--and the dangerous consequences.
It deals precisely with the egalitarian, redemptive movement and projectory confusion and presents a clear exegesis of scripture.
A very gracious and generous response to Webb's book. However, by beginning with a clear statement of what his conclusions will be (complementarian), some of the arguments are not completely convincing. However, it is a good presentation of an alternate view.
Christian theologian John Frame once said that “The discussion of the man-woman relationship has greatly intensified since the 1970s.” I think Frame is right. Much discussion has been ongoing and many books have been written on the topic. Different movements have also arise over the decades. One such movement focuses more on the hermeneutics of how we approach the Scriptures and how we interpret passages concerning the relationship of man and woman. It is called the redemptive-movement with William Webb being the notable leader of the group. While different people affiliated with this movement may differ in some of their conclusion nevertheless we can safely say that their hermeneutics lead them to the conclusion of egalitarianism. This is a book length critique of the movement from a Complementarian perspective.
The author Benjamin Reaoch has done the church a service in writing this book. The book was adapted from the author’s doctoral dissertation at Southern Seminary. His adviser was the New Testament scholar Dr. Thomas Schreiner. Schreiner wrote a foreword for the book. Although both Reaoch and Schreiner are Southern Baptists it was Presbyterian and Reformed (P&R) that published it. I’m glad they did because this was a wonderful response to the Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic.
The book consists of six chapters. The first chapter describes the Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic. Since this school of thought believes that the New Testament discussion of women’s role is the same as the issue of slavery proponents believe that given that there are trajectories in the New Testament that leads us to head towards the abolition of slavery the same could be said about abolishing patriarchy found in the Bible. Since the movement focuses on what Scripture says about slavery and women it makes sense that the second and third chapters of the book surveyed New Testament statements concerning slavery and women. Chapter four compares the data give in chapters two and three. Finally chapters five and six are two chapters on hermeneutical considerations.
I enjoyed how this book was laid out. I thought there were some sound theological method in how the book was organized. Reaoch first began with a fair description of the redemptive-movement hermeneutic and even with a discussion of the nineteenth-century slavery debate in the America. While the latter might be more of a historical theology’s interests nevertheless since some of the academic discussions also brought up the abolitionists certainly it is worthwhile to consider their approach towards the Bible in regards to the slavery debate. I also thought the author did a good job by looking first at what Scripture has to say concerning slavery and women, and letting that shape one’s hermeneutical considerations. Of course hermeneutics will shape how one interpret the Scripture but if we properly understand the complex interrelationships of hermeneutics and exegesis we must also realize that exegesis, that is, the retrieved content of Scripture should also shape our methodological and hermeneutical considerations. I thought Reaoch did a good job of doing that in the book. His handling of Scripture is done with care and it is a plus that he also handles those whom he disagree with fairly.
As an example of the author handling Scripture carefully I thought on page 120 Reaoch did a good job of pointing out that not every details of creation is exactly for everyone to do today, details such as vegetarianism, farming and walking as a means of ground transportation. He caveats that by writing that it is in the New Testament that highlight what details from the creation account are significant and remain normative for us today. It is in this light that Reaoch then goes to the New Testament where he also pointed out how the egalitarians are wrong to argue that 1 Timothy 2:13 is appealing to the cultural custom of primogeniture (first born honor and duty) since the passage is not appealing to that practice but instead it is appealing to the historical event of creation. In other words, the passage is not cultural but is meant to tell us what prescriptively remains in ethical force for us today from the creation account. I also thought Reaoch made a good observation that egalitarians often assume a creation versus redemption paradigm but Scripture teaches it is a sin versus redemption framework as being the point of the old self versus the new self in the New Testament. More importantly he looks at the ground basis appealed to for slavery and women’s role and he notes that the ground for both of them are different which refutes the idea that both are analogous.
There were many things that I found interesting throughout the book. Personally reading the segment on the nineteenth century slavery debate made me want to read up more on the historical setting and actual arguments given during that time. It was neat to see the book mentioned how 1 Timothy 1:10 which prohibits “man-stealing” along with 1 Corinthians 7:21 which teaches slaves to seek their freedom if the opportunity arises were the seeds for the abolitionism. I also had a great moment of personal devotional and communion with Christ when the author pointed out how in the New Testament individuals who often seen as the lowest in society have great potential to display the transforming power of the Christian faith in their act of submission with the examples of slaves (Titus 2:9-10), and wives (Titus 2:4-5, 1 Peter 3:5-6). It challenges our modern notion that the only meaningful influence is top-down; but God has it the other way around.
Overall a good book. I recommend it.
This book is a direct response to William Webb's book with the title reminiscent of Webb's innovative work on Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutics (RMH). Called a "complementarian response to the Redemptive Movement Hermeneutic," it provides a robust rebuttal to Webb's theory.

Key to Reaoch's rejection of RMH is to delink the issue of slavery from the gender issues in the Bible. In other words, Webb has "overemphasized the similarities" of the two issues, which as a result casts doubts on the hermeneutical reach of RMH into other controversial topics in the Bible. Reaoch argues that the New Testament does not condemn slavery or command all masters to release their slaves. It is also wrong to insert an "ultimate ethic" into the Bible, and justify a total release of all slaves. This, together with several other moves by RMH to "move beyond the biblical instructions" are deemed "unwarranted." Reaoch does this by using two criteria. For RMH to be viable, it must be both "hermeneutically persuasive" and "exegetically faithful." Before applying his examination, he lists some proponents of RMH. Krister Stendahl argues for a trajectory toward total freedom of slavery on the basis of Galatians 3:28 and 1 Corinthians 11:11-12. R. T. France argues that since there is a slow process toward total abolition of slavery, there is a similar egalitarian movement, that leads to an ultimate purpose in Christ. Along with Richard Longenecker, David Thompson, Kevin Giles, I. Howard Marshall and finally William Webb, these scholars turn specific instructions to a general principle of an ultimate ethic, connect slavery with gender matters, tie together racism and slavery to bring about their redemptive trajectory that leads to an ultimate ethic.

Reaoch then goes on an exegetical study to verify the findings of these scholars. First, he deals with all the scriptural references on slavery, working through five key New Testament passages; namely, Ephesians 6:5-8, Colossians 3:22-4:1, 1 Timothy 6:1, Titus 2:9-10, and 1 Peter 2:18-25. He asserts that the New Testament neither condemns nor commends slavery, just like how the Bible does not condemn nor commend patriarchy. On the issue of women, Reaoch also draws a parallel to his earlier work on slavery, and highlights five passages; namely, Eph. 5:22-33; Col. 3:18-19; 1 Tim. 2:9-15; 1 Cor. 11:2-16; 1 Cor. 14:33b-35. Key to Reaoch's method is a distinction between "ground clauses" and "purposes clauses" pertaining to each imperative. In terms of the latter, there are marked similarities of the link between biblical teachings on slavery and women. However, on the former, the similarities disappear. Simply put, "ground clauses" are what the texts say. "Purpose clauses" are what the texts point toward. RMH proponents say the revelation of scripture moves forward toward an ultimate ethic. Reaoch argues against it, questioning why then Paul moves backward to the creation narrative when talking about the authority of man over the woman. Moreover, there are far too many differences in "ground clauses" between the slavery passages and the women passages, that the best interpretation is not to lump the two issues together. If that is true, RMH will be undermined.

At the hermeutical section, Reaoch takes issue with eight of Webb's 18 criteria. He questions Webb's "theological analogies" that the passages chosen (Ephesians 5 and 1 Cor 11) by Webb are not to be interpret as analogies for something else, but they reflect the very nature of God Himself. Pivotal to Reaoch's argument is the frequent backward references to the creation mandate by the apostle Paul. Another issue is whether redemption "trumps" creation, which is a vital point when arguing for an "ultimate ethic." Reaoch ends with a passionate plea for readers to have a clear understanding of what biblical manhood and womanhood means. We cannot allow culture to dictate our interpretation of biblical literature, nor let postmodernism defines our faith. The author acknowledges that issues of gender and slavery remain formidable issues, but the resolution of them require both hermeneutical persuasiveness AND exegetical faithfulness.

My Thoughts
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I must commend Reaoch for a job well done. The work is indeed faithful to the exegesis of the biblical texts and a careful hermeneutical application of the word. The author puts his heart and soul into the book by claiming that his heart is to teach, to preach, and to lead with conviction that is based on an accurate study of the biblical texts. He even reviews the four recent views (Walter Kaiser, Daniel Doriani, Kevin Vanhoozer, and William Webb) with regards to theological movement beyond the Bible, reserving his heaviest artillery for Webb. In conclusion, Reaoch commends the hermeneutical "intention" of Webb, but strongly disputes the exegetical part of Webb's work.

I see the merits of Reaoch's work, but questions the intensity of his disagreement with Webb. Sometimes, I feel that Reaoch may have overstretched himself in the critique of Webb's RMH. There are merits to RMH as it is one of the most innovative hermeneutical methods offered for the evangelical world so far. It has reinvigorated biblical hermeneutics and the need for creative interpretation. Reaoch, while he does a good job in taking apart Webb's RMH proposal, he does not offer an alternative, which is regrettable. It is one thing to tear down someone else's ideas. It is yet another to offer a constructive alternative, of a similar magnitude as RMH. Maybe, if Webb can be offered a platform to respond to Reaoch, we will get the best of hermeneutical persuasion and the best of exegetical faithfulness. Even better, both Reaoch and Webb should write a book together.

Rating: 4.5 stars of 5.

conrade
This book is provided to me free by P & R Publishing and NetGalley without any obligation for a positive review. All opinions offered above are mine unless otherwise stated or implied.