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Who Were the Early Israelites and Where Did They Come From? epub

by William G. Dever


Who Were the Early Israelites and Where Did They Come From? epub

ISBN: 0802844162

ISBN13: 978-0802844163

Author: William G. Dever

Category: Bibles

Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference

Language: English

Publisher: Eerdmans (March 31, 2006)

Pages: 280 pages

ePUB book: 1878 kb

FB2 book: 1564 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 770

Other Formats: mbr docx rtf mobi





Who Were the Early Israelites and Where Did They Come From? is a book by American biblical scholar and archaeologist William G. Dever

Who Were the Early Israelites and Where Did They Come From? is a book by American biblical scholar and archaeologist William G. Dever. Dever has been prominent in the debate between biblical "maximalists" and "minimalists" over the historicity of the Bible (specifically the Old Testament)

Specific reconstructions of By William G.

Specific reconstructions of By William G.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. has been added to your Cart. This book addresses one of the most timely and urgent topics in archaeology and biblical studies - the origins of early Israel. For centuries the Western tradition has traced its beginnings back to ancient Israel.

is a book by American biblical scholar and archaeologist William G. Dever

ISBN 0 8] is a book by American biblical scholar and archaeologist William G. Dever has been prominent in the debate between biblical maximalists and minimalists over the weight which can be accorded. ISBN 0-8028-0975-8] is a book by American biblical scholar and archaeologist William G. This book, which coincided with Dever's retirement from the University of Arizona, where he served as professor of Near Eastern Archaeology and Anthropology for many years, was written on a semi-popular level to explain the background and origin of the people Dever describes as the "protoIsraelites.

In Who Were the Early Israelite This book addresses one of the most timely and urgent topics in archaeology and biblical studies - the origins of early Israel. For centuries the Western tradition has traced its beginnings back to ancient Israel, but recently some historians and archaeologists have questioned the reality of Israel as it is described in biblical literature.

This book addresses one of the most timely and urgent topics in archaeology and biblical studies - the origins of early .

This book addresses one of the most timely and urgent topics in archaeology and biblical studies - the origins of early Israel.

Among archaeologists who study ancient Israel, William G. Dever is a

Among archaeologists who study ancient Israel, William G. Dever is a. His approach differs from those archaeologists who consider the Old Testament as having nothing that can be drawn from regarding the history of Israel, and his approach differs from conservatives and fundamentalists who consider the scriptures to be the literal and unadulterated truth. com, "much of what writes is based upon his enormous experience in archaeology and more importantly his own fieldwork

1 Identifying sites as Israelites is not always straightforward, and various criteria were offered over the years (. They were driven to settle in theIsraelite came from Egypt, many archaeologists believe that they actually originatedin the lan.

1 Identifying sites as Israelites is not always straightforward, and various criteria were offered over the years (. Dever 2003;Bloch-Smith 2003;Faust 2006a, and references). While no consensus had been reached, during the Iron II, which is the focus of this paper, the questionable sites are fewer and, moreover, there is usually an agreement whether a certain temple was Israelite or no. . Bayesian representation of a prolonged archaeological debate §. Article.

Who were the early Israelites and where did they come from? William Dever Chapter 1 Cornell Notes Possible Thesis: Archaeological data can illuminate the historical context of the biblical narratives; to think it can (or should) prove or disprove miracles is, again, to miss the point.

Who were the early Israelites and where did they come from? William Dever Chapter 1 Cornell Notes Possible Thesis: Archaeological data can illuminate the historical context of the biblical narratives; to think it can (or should) prove or disprove miracles is, again, to miss the point (16).

This book addresses one of the most timely and urgent topics in archaeology and biblical studies -- the origins of early Israel. For centuries the Western tradition has traced its beginnings back to ancient Israel, but recently some historians and archaeologists have questioned the reality of Israel as it is described in biblical literature. In Who Were the Early Israelites and Where Did They Come From? William Dever explores the continuing controversies regarding the true nature of ancient Israel and presents the archaeological evidence for assessing the accuracy of the well-known Bible stories. Confronting the range of current scholarly interpretations seriously and dispassionately, Dever rejects both the revisionists who characterize biblical literature as "pious propaganda" and the conservatives who are afraid to even question its factuality. Attempting to break through this impasse, Dever draws on thirty years of archaeological fieldwork in the Near East, amassing a wide range of hard evidence for his own compelling view of the development of Israelite history. In his search for the actual circumstances of Israel's emergence in Canaan, Dever reevaluates the Exodus-Conquest traditions in the books of Exodus, Numbers, Joshua, Judges, and 1 & 2 Samuel in the light of well-documented archaeological evidence from the late Bronze Age and early Iron Age. Among this important evidence are some 300 small agricultural villages recently discovered in the heartland of what would later become the biblical nation of Israel. According to Dever, the authentic ancestors of the "Israelite peoples" were most likely Canaanites -- together with some pastoral nomads and small groups of Semitic slaves escaping from Egypt -- who, through the long cultural and socioeconomic struggles recounted in the book of Judges, managed to forge a new agrarian, communitarian, and monotheistic society. Written in an engaging, accessible style and featuring fifty photographs that help bring the archaeological record to life, this book provides an authoritative statement on the origins of ancient Israel and promises to reinvigorate discussion about the historicity of the biblical tradition.  
Fantastic book! A great summary of the state of belief regarding Israelite origins within the archeological community at the time of writing, a state that remains generally true today. I would rate the book at 4.5 stars with the half star penalty resulting from one distracting feature. The author's criticism of the work of Israel Finkelstein is at times tedious and almost childish. While relying heavily on the work of Professor Finkelstein, the author overstates his criticism of the origins theory of the former.

I strongly recommend this book as well as those of Professor Finkelstein, particularly "The Bible Unearthed: Archeology's New Vision of Ancient Israel"

And, by the way, I agree with Professor Dever's view of origins.
A very good and archaelogically sophisticated book. It has no big announcements of a political or religious nature. When I first began to read, despite an empirical prediliction, I thought "where's the beef". Half way thru I realized I was really picking up some fundamental bacground information. I believe anybody with a political or/and religious interest in Israel will benefit from this book. It's for the serious reader and takes some attention, but well worth it as views contrary to the author's are also explored.
An extraordinary read for those interested in this part of the world. The idea of questioning the legitimacy of Jews or Arabs belonging to the land of their ancient fathers is an absurdity. Dever deals with the issue with restraint, insight and dignity and allows his readers to evaluate the story fairly. He reveals the evidence piece by piece, exposes alternative views for what they are, and allows one to glimpse an ancient landscape as fascinating then as now.
Dever is a moderate in the battles over Old Testament history -- he doesn't think the Bible is infallible, but he doesn't think it's made up nonsense either. He uses his training as an archaeologist to review the evidence surrounding early Bible history. Literalists won't be happy, but liberals can find some solid background to better understand this important period.
In a field where back biting is the rule and many scholars simply dismiss the writing of their opponents out of hand, William Dever stands out for his careful critiques of the theories of those with whom he disagrees. As with his other works, Prof. Dever engages in a point by point refutation of those who differ from his positions. At the same time, as in previous works, he reveals the political/ideological motivations of many other scholars.

Doubtless, many readers will wish to see this as a political work, but in fact Professor Dever's theory, that the Israelite tribes evolved from displaced Canaanites who merged with other marginal groups would please few ideologues. Perhaps that is because his primary interest remains constructing a cogent theory that fits with the available data? Of particular note, Professor Dever does an excellent job synthesizing anthropological and archeological evidence to craft his thesis.

In a few places professor Dever does fall short. While he does a good job demonstrating how Biblical and archeological data do and don't mesh, his textual analysis on issues such as the bible writers knowledge of Egyptian names seems occasionally lacking. Still, his easy writing style and crisp prose offer an enlightening and entertaining read for those interested in the subject. Those of an ideological bent may find much in this book to upset them, but those seeking knowledge will be glad they picked it up.
This was a historical and cultural mystery story, well-investigated, well-told. It could make an exciting TV thriller. Dever compares the latest archaeological and historical knowledge with the biblical information about the origin and history of ancient Israel. He assaults the "revisionists" and "nihilists" who say we cannot know details about ancient Israel or there was not an ancient Israel and provides archaeological evidence indicating clarification of Israel or proto-Israel from the 13th century BCE, from an extra-biblical Egyptian textual source and archaeological sources.
Dever provides a readable survey of archeological evidence and the debates among leading scholars over the origins of the Early Israelites. This scholarly information takes up most of the volume.

The outcome of his review is the assertion that Early Israelites emerged from within Canaan after a period of internal collapse. The new phenomenon occurred when elements within Canaan began settling the highlands which were frontier areas at the time. Where did they come from? Certainly not from Egypt en masse, for there is no archeological evidence of the Exodus or wandering in the Sinai wilderness. There clearly is no evidence for a conquest as outlined in the Book of Joshua.

Dever is very clear that he is in agreement with Israel Finkelstein and others that it is the archeological record that must be looked to as the basis of constructing the early history of Israel. But unlike other archeologists, he thinks that some of the stories in the Bible may have limited historical validity. Most notably, he points to the Joseph Cycle and to the fact that the central highlands of Canaan were inhabited by the "House of Joseph" (Manasseh, Ephraim and even Benjamin) as evidence that there may have been elements of the early Israelites with an Egyptian background whose stories are represented in the Bible. Nevertheless, his conclusion is quite clear that the Exodus and conquest were mythical events and not history, as is clearly indicated by the results of archaeology.