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The Debate about the Bible: Inerrancy Vs. Infallibility epub

by Russell K Pitzer Professor Philosophy Stephen T Davis


The Debate about the Bible: Inerrancy Vs. Infallibility epub

ISBN: 0664241190

ISBN13: 978-0664241193

Author: Russell K Pitzer Professor Philosophy Stephen T Davis

Category: Bibles

Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference

Language: English

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press; Later Printing edition (September 1, 1977)

Pages: 149 pages

ePUB book: 1906 kb

FB2 book: 1715 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 371

Other Formats: txt mbr lrf txt





Biblical infallibility is the belief that what the Bible says regarding matters . Stephen T. Davis, The Debate about the Bible: Inerrancy versus Infallibility (Westminster Press, 1977), p. 23. ^

Biblical infallibility is the belief that what the Bible says regarding matters of faith and Christian practice is wholly useful and true. It is the "belief that the Bible is completely trustworthy as a guide to salvation and the life of faith and will not fail to accomplish its purpose Lambrecht therefore writes that . ^ Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy, Article XI.

Davis lays out a good introduction into the three different views on the topic of errors in the bible (hard inerrancy, soft inerrancy, and infallibility)

Davis lays out a good introduction into the three different views on the topic of errors in the bible (hard inerrancy, soft inerrancy, and infallibility). The first view holds that the bible is true in all that it says cross discipline (science, history, faith, practice), the second that the bible is true in all that it affirms or teaches (again across discipline) and the third arguing that while the bible is reliable it does contain errors (typically historical and scientific but not in matters Davis lays

More by Stephen T. Davis. Disputed Issues: Contending for Christian Faith in Today's Academic Setting. George Carey, Stephen T. After We Die: Theology, Philosophy, and the Question of Life After Death.

More by Stephen T. Risen Indeed: Making Sense of the Resurrection.

com's Stephen T. Davis Author Page. The Debate about the Bible: Inerrancy Vs. Infallibility Sep 01, 1977. by Russell K Pitzer Professor Philosophy Stephen T Davis. 2 ).

The Debate About the Bible: Inerrancy Versus Infallibility. Philadelphia: Westminster Press, 1977. Faith, Skepticism, and Evidence: An Essay in Religious Epistemology. A few paragraphs from pp. 34-35 of this book are reprinted in Raymond Martin and Christopher Bernard, God Matters: Readings in the Philosophy of Religion. New York: Longmans, 2003). The Trinity: An Interdisciplinary Symposium on theTrinity. Who Can Forgive Sins But God Alone?’

Find nearly any book by Stephen T Davis. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers.

Find nearly any book by Stephen T Davis. ISBN 9781602581517 (978-1-60258-151-7) Softcover, Baylor University Press, 2009.

Definitions of infallibility differ widely. This is the definition is the one used by Stephen T. Davis in his book The Debate about the Bible: Inerrancy versus Infallibility

Definitions of infallibility differ widely. In common speech, 'infallibility' can refer to a person (or a group of persons), to an act of teaching by these persons, or to the information being taught. Infallibility is sometimes used to refer to someone's ability to learn something with certainty. Davis in his book The Debate about the Bible: Inerrancy versus Infallibility. In it also asserts that infallibility does not assert perfection on matters of geography, history, or science. But that it is reliable, accurate and trustworthy for all matters of faith and spirituality including spiritual salvation.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Russell K Pitzer Professor Of Philosophy Stephen T Davis books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles.

Other Options: Abbreviate Books. Inerrancy contends that the Bible does not have any errors of fact or any statements that are contradictory. With respect to the importance of the inerrancy issue, Bible believers usually take one of three positions

Other Options: Abbreviate Books. Quotes Around Verses. Remove Square Brackets. Browse Dictionary Topics. Inerrancy is more concerned with the details of Scripture. Infallibility is the broader term. With respect to the importance of the inerrancy issue, Bible believers usually take one of three positions. They include the following: Inerrancy Is True and Should Be Used as a Test of Fellowship.

John MacArthur on Education - Inerrant vs Infallible. ^

John MacArthur on Education - Inerrant vs Infallible. Is the Bible Infallible? Transcription. 1 Infallibility and inerrancy. 2 Biblical integrity. Its infallibility means we can trust the Bible to truly communicate to us what God wants us to believe and how God wants us to live. To ignore or disobey the teachings of Scripture is to contradict its infallibility, which puts us on a completely different theological path altogether.

1977
Do you ever wonder if the Bible contains factual errors?
If it does contain any errors, what are the theological implications?
For those who say it contains no errors, what are the philosophical and theological implications?
Is there a way to honor the authority of the Bible as being inspired yet imperfect in certain types of claims it makes?

If so, this may be just the book for you. The author considers conciseness a virtue and has provide a tidy little paperback that addresses the intramural debate of Biblical Inerrancy vs. Infallibility. As you might imagine, he has to define terms and positions quite a bit.

Roughly speaking there are two types of Inerrancy - Strict and Limited. Against these two positions the author defines his own position, Infallibility. Infallibility concedes there can be (and are) some factual errors in the Bible but these do not impact crucial matters of faith and practice.

Most of the book is spent answering the Inerrantists objections to this Infallibility position. Namely the author presents his case that
1) The Bible itself does not claim to be Inerrant in the way that term is used in the church today.

2) It is very reasonable to trust the Bible on matters of Christian faith and practice even though it contains some factual errors not pending on these subjects.

3) Conceding the non-critical errors in the Bible does not lead one down a slippery slope of theological liberalism.

4) Infallibility is an intellectually honest and faithful way to approach the Bible we actually have as opposed to the one the Inerrantist wish God had given us.

The author is a philosopher with good theological knowledge. If you like or at least tolerate positions presented and critiqued according to their logical form, validity and soundness of premises, you will probably love this book. If those ideas are not familiar to you, or you can't stand them, this book may not be for you. I would categorize it an intermediate book in philosophical theology, but still written for the laymen (few technical terms, but some precise critical thinking).

The Historical Critical method of analysis is accepted by the author, but not the naturalistic presuppositions of many of those authors. Most evangelical Christians would not agree. There is a short discussion on what it means to be evangelical, but this seems so intramural to me it is not very helpful.

One thing I do not like about the author's case in favor of Infallibility is he thinks it does not commit the error of being unfalsifiable. Inerrancy is clearly defined and refined to avoid any realistic criteria which could ever prove it false. This is a clear weakness in that position. The author feels he avoids this by being open to the possibility that someone could someday prove the Bible commits yet one more error and this time on something that does affect its authority for Christian faith and practice. Technically this is still inductive in that he leaves open the theoretical possibility the Bible could error in an important area. But in practice how could this ever be shown in an objective way to really turn those that accept the author's Infallibility premise? In my view the author's Infallibility is subject to the same lack of being falsified that is also a fault in inerrancy, just in a slightly different way.

I really enjoyed reading this book and it has helped me think through some things. Thanks to my pastor for recommending it to me.
I had read this several years ago and had to have it again. Excellent perspective on the topic. More should read and seriously consider what Davis is saying.